'Generation Z' is Coming—and They'll Outnumber the World's Millennials Within a Year

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iStock

Millennials tend to steal the spotlight—whether it be for blowing their savings on avocado toast or killing mayonnaise—but it won’t be a Millennial’s world much longer. As Bloomberg reports, the younger Generation Z is quietly on track to outnumber Millennials in 2019.

Using data from the United Nations, Bloomberg predicted that Gen Z will make up 32 percent of the global population in 2019, compared to an estimated 31.5 percent of Millennials. However, Millennials will still remain the largest group in the world's top four economies: the U.S., China, Japan, and Germany.

"Millennial" has incorrectly become a catch-all term for all young people, but the Pew Research Center defines the group as those born between 1981 and 1996 (22-37 years old). It also defined a "Post-Millennial" group as those who were born in 1997 or later, but not everyone agrees on that criteria.

For its analysis, Bloomberg defined members of Gen Z as those who were born in 2001 or later. This is a population that has never known a world that isn't digitally connected, and many Americans in this age group probably don't remember a time when the country wasn't at war.

For some perspective: 2001 was the year that Britney Spears and Justin Timberlake wore their iconic (and matching) all-denim outfits, camera phones had just been made commercially available, and the first Harry Potter and The Lord of the Rings movies had just been released. Most importantly, the oldest members of Gen Z will be turning 18 next year, making them eligible to vote.

This means they will also soon dominate the workforce, but there's some good news in it for employers. Gen Z is widely reported to be less self-centered than their Millennial counterparts; they're characterized by often trying to create their own solutions rather than looking to others for help, according to a report entitled "Rise of Gen Z: New Challenge for Retailers." They also tend to be more optimistic about the economy and social progress, and "anticipate being slightly happier than" Millennials, according to a survey by Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Ltd.

[h/t Bloomberg]

The Leonid Meteor Shower Peaks This Weekend—Here's the Best Way to Watch It

mdesigner125/iStock via Getty Images
mdesigner125/iStock via Getty Images

We're nearing the end of 2019, but there are still a few astronomical events to catch before the year is s out. This Sunday—November 17—the Leonid meteor shower is expected to peak. Here's everything you need to know before viewing the spectacle.

What is the Leonid meteor shower?

Like all meteor showers, the Leonids are caused by meteoroids from outer space burning up on their descent toward Earth. These particular shooting stars come from the rocky tail of Comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. Each November, debris from the comet pummels the Earth's atmosphere, causing meteors to light up the sky at rates that can exceed 1000 per hour.

The Leonids won't reach that frequency this year. According to EarthSky, the meteors would peak at a rate of around 10 to 15 per hour in a dark, moonless sky. But because the moon will be bright this weekend, sky-gazers will likely see less of them, with only the brightest shooting stars shining through.

How to See the Leonids

For your best chance of spotting the Leonids, look up the night of Sunday, November 17 and early in the morning of Monday, November 18. The shower reaches its peak after midnight. The moon will be in its waning gibbous phase at that time, so even with clear skies, viewing conditions won't be ideal. But there are ways to increase your chances of seeing as many meteors as possible. Try finding a large object to stand under—such as a tree or building—that will block your view of the moon. If you don't see anything right away, be patient: The more time you give your eyes to adjust to the darkness, the more likely you are to spot a shooting star.

How Much Are You Spending on Streaming Services? This Handy Calculator Can Tell You

LightFieldStudios/iStock via Getty Images
LightFieldStudios/iStock via Getty Images

With the recent debut of both Disney+ and Apple TV+, not to mention upcoming launches for HBO Max, NBC’s Peacock, and more, streaming services are officially coming for cable television’s throne—and might sneakily empty your bank account while they're at it.

While a monthly fee of $10 to $15 seems easy enough to justify if you’re willing to sacrifice a burrito bowl or fancy cocktail once a month, the little voice in the back of your head is probably whispering, “but it still adds up.” To find out just how much, MarketWatch created a calculator that will not only tell you how much you’re spending on streaming services every month; it’ll also add up the lifetime cost of all those entertainment expenses.

The calculator covers Netflix, CBS All Access, Hulu, Amazon Prime, Sling TV, Disney+, Apple TV+, and YouTube TV, and it also includes a whole host of add-ons that you might not even have realized were available. Through Amazon Prime, for example, you can subscribe to HBO, Showtime, and other premium channels—but there are also more niche options like Hallmark Movies Now and NickHits (with iCarly, The Fairly OddParents, and other Nickelodeon classics).

As you check off services and add-ons, you’ll see your monthly bill on the right side of the total box, and the lifetime cost—which accounts for 50 years of streaming, adjusted for inflation—will balloon before your eyes on the left side. Below that, there’s an even larger number labeled as the lifetime “true” cost, which estimates how much you would’ve made if you had invested that money instead.

For example: If you sign up for basic monthly subscriptions to Netflix and Disney+ for $9 and $7, respectively, your lifetime cost totals around $16,200. However, if you had opted to invest that money, the 50-year prediction sees you walking away with almost $74,000.

Having said that, it’s understandably hard to look that far into the future, especially when Disney+ is tempting you with the Lizzie McGuire series, Star Wars spinoff The Mandalorian, and practically every beloved animated Disney movie from your childhood.

[h/t MarketWatch]

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