25 Surprising Facts About Deadwood

HBO
HBO

David Milch's Deadwood, which premiered on HBO in 2004, earned critical praise, launched careers, and won a devoted fan following over its three seasons. While admirers of the dark Western crime drama have long lamented its too-short run on television, they got a second dose of the series with 2019's Deadwood: The Movie.

We're celebrating this stellar series with these behind-the-scenes details that will deepen your appreciation of all things Seth Bullock and Al Swearengen.

1. Deadwood was shot on a famous ranch.

Much of the series was shot on the sets of Melody Ranch in Santa Clarita Valley, California. Established in 1915, this location has been the backdrop to a long legacy of Westerns. Television shows like Gunsmoke, The Cisco Kid, The Gene Autry Show, The Lone Ranger, and Have Gun—Will Travel lensed there, as did movies like High Noon, The Gunfighter, and Django Unchained.

2. The series was based on the real Deadwood, South Dakota.

H. R. Locke & Co. of Deadwood, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

In the 1870s, Deadwood, South Dakota was a place full of criminals and entrepreneurs. Series creator David Milch rigorously researched the real Deadwood by reading its newspapers, the diaries of its residents, and formal historical accounts like Black Hills expert Watson Parker's Deadwood: The Golden Years.

3. Many of the series' characters are real people.

Wild Bill Hickok and Calamity Jane might have been Deadwood's most famous residents, but Al Swearengen, Seth Bullock, Sol Star, E.B. Farnum, A.W. Merrick, Charlie Utter, and George Hearst were all real people with noted moments in history, too. However, characters like Trixie, Whitney Ellsworth, and Alma Garret were largely fictional, based more on archetypes of people who would've had a place in Deadwood.

4. The real Seth Bullock was called a "bad man with a gun."

Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

As in the show, Seth Bullock came to Deadwood with his friend Sol Star to open a hardware store. He invested in the community, headed health care boards, and became the town's first sheriff. That last vocation earned him the aforementioned reputation, which endeared him to Theodore Roosevelt, whom Bullock later successfully helped campaign for the presidency of the United States. The Chicago Tribune later ran a delightful description of Bullock: "Bullock attracted general attention around the White House today. He has a fierce looking melodrama-villain's mustache and wears a sombrero."

5. The real Al Swearengen was no romantic anti-hero.

In Deadwood, Ian McShane's Al Swearengen is a pimp, crook, and murderer, but he is also the protector of the "crippled" Jewel and grimly civic-minded. The real Swearengen was much less admirable. He was a sex trafficker, tricking women into coming to Deadwood to work in his various business ventures—like a theater—but then forcing them into prostitution. His wife publicly accused him of domestic abuse. Eventually, he was run out of Deadwood and died of a massive head wound that was either caused by a fall from a failed leap onto a freight train or a willful act of murder.

6. David Milch didn't want Ian McShane to audition for the role of Al Swearengen.

Getty Images

Milch was convinced Ian McShane would be miscast as Swearengen. In Deadwood: Stories of the Black Hills, he recalls, "Physically, Ian was absolutely wrong for the part. I didn't even want to read him. I had imagined Swearengen as a physically imposing specimen. But when Ian came in, he neutralized all of that, because he had Swearengen's essence, which was fierce matter-of-factness. He was who he was, unadulterated."

7. The real George Hearst was a working-class hero.

Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

George Hearst (who is played by Gerald McRaney in the series) was a self-made man who had a real gift for mining gold. The series painted him as a robber baron whose gold lust threatened Deadwood's existence. But there was much more to Hearst. He was raised on his parents' farm in Franklin County, Missouri, but left their homestead to join the Gold Rush in 1850. He made his first million in the Comstock Lode in Nevada, and after his dealings in Deadwood, he went on to become a senator.

Described as a "plain old Missourian, of small education and no polish of manners" by Cosmopolitan in 1888, Hearst purchased The San Francisco Daily Examiner in 1880, and a new family business was born seven years later when he handed the reins to his only son, William Randolph Hearst.

8. Calamity Jane really did care for the sick.

Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

In season one, smallpox hits Deadwood and Doc and Jane see to the afflicted. This generous action has been historically documented, along with Jane's trademark rough-and-tumble appearance. In Estelline Bennett's Old Deadwood Days, she paints a picture of Calamity Jane (a.k.a. Martha Canary):

"She was a plain woman, looking older than she really was. She wore a dark cloth coat that never had been good, a cheap little hat, a faded frayed skirt and arctic overshoes … She came unscathed through the long smallpox siege and most of her patients lived. Dr. Babcock believed that without her care not one of them would have pulled through."

9. Calamity Jane and Wild Bill weren't really that close.

It's suspected that their connection has been conflated over the years as a part of the blossoming tall tales of the Old West. The pair did come to Deadwood together, but hadn't known each other long before that. However, in her memoir, Jane did describe him as a friend. And the two, who died nearly 30 years apart, were buried beside each other in Deadwood's Mount Moriah Cemetery.

10. General Samuel Fields was a Deadwood celebrity.

As actor Franklyn Ajaye did in the series, General Samuel Fields proudly called himself "The N****r General." He was a notable presence in the camp not only for his claims of being a Union Army general, but also for his flamboyant personality. This made him a recurring figure in the local newspapers like the Black Hills Pioneer, where he was described as "irrepressible, duplicatory, candescent," "the 'slycoon' senegambian," and "The Shakespearian Darkey." He was also an outspoken activist for the African-American community of Deadwood.

11. St. Paul inspired Reverend Smith's epilepsy plot line.

It was the tragic end of Deadwood preacher Reverend Henry Weston Smith (played by Ray McKinnon) that earned the notice of Milch. Though he was fond of saying The Bible was his protection, Smith was murdered making his way from Deadwood to a neighboring town to preach. The sermon found with his remains was "Upon Whose Life We Shall Base Ours, Upon Whom Better Than the Great Sinner Paul."

As Milch had suspected, St. Paul might have been a sufferer of temporal-lobe epilepsy. He decided to blend this element into Smith's Deadwood counterpart, leading to a different demise (in this case: mercy killing at the hands of Swearengen).

12. If the series hadn't been canceled, The Gem would have burned down.

Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Assuming Milch continued to follow the path the real Swearengen blazed, then his beloved saloon would be burned down—likely by one of the whoremonger's many enemies. But you can't keep Al down. In real life, Swearengen rebuilt it bigger and better than before, and it stood for another 20 years … until someone burned it down again.

13. The origin of Trixie's name came from an old crime report.

In the first episode, we meet Trixie (Paula Malcomson) after she shoots a john in self-defense. This is a nod to the inspiration for her name. In John S. McClintock's memoir, Pioneer Days Of The Black Hills, he recounts, "I beheld a man lying on the floor with a bullet hole clear through his head back of his eyes. The woman 'Tricksie' grabbed a pistol while he was beating her and turned the tables on him."

In another Deadwood nod to true life, Doc Cochran responds to the corpse just as the doctor who arrived on the scene did. He "ran a probe through his head" to inspect the damage to the brain.

14. Paula Malcomson may have saved Trixie's life.

Getty Images

Over the seasons, Trixie the whore became an indelible part of Deadwood and the makeup of its titular town. But early on, the actress who played her feared her stint on the series would be short-lived. According to Malcomson, this all changed with "Reconnoitering the Rim," in which Trixie shaves the calluses off of Al's feet with a straight razor.

The scene was originally set with the two in bed, but Malcomson suggested the foot shaving business—something her father used to do for her grandfather—would give the pair's relationship a greater sense of depth and intimacy. She improvised the line, "Shall I do the other foot?" And McShane replied, "Please." She recalls, "The minute he said, 'Please,' I knew it was a new place for us." And Trixie was preserved.

15. Sol and Trixie would never have married.

Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Though Sol Star became a celebrated and respected leader in the Deadwood community—first as a businessman, then as its mayor—he never did get married, even after traveling East in search of a bride. All the same, it seems he was too well liked to ever be lonely.

In 1901's The Great Northwest and Its Men of Progress, he was described thusly:

"Some men have a genius for popularity. With no effort on their part they become a sort of social or political center from which there seems to radiate an aroma of good fellowship, permeating the entire community. Frank and generous; genial in disposition; ever ready with a helping hand for a fellow in distress; jovial and social, yet, in serious matters keen and penetrating; sound in judgment; full of resources in emergency; energy unbounded, and a public spirit ready for war in the interests of his town, country, or state. These are some of the characteristics of a naturally popular man."

16. David Milch was determined to get Garret Dillahunt on Deadwood.

Getty Images

Maybe you noticed Dillahunt played both Wild Bill's crop-eared killer James McCall as well as the kinky and sadistic geologist Francis Wolcott. But his road to Deadwood was paved with false starts. Dillahunt initially auditioned for the role of Seth Bullock, then Doc Cochran, before being cast as McCall. After the rogue fled Deadwood for good in season 1, Milch decided to bring Dillahunt back in season 2. First Milch considered him for the role of Hearst, but ultimately chose him to play Wolcott, minus the prosthetics that marred his appearance in season 1.

17. Before Deadwood, David Milch pitched HBO a series about Nero's Rome.

Unbeknownst to Milch, HBO had already green-lit Rome. Milch believed his fascination with how society can form from chaos could be explored in another historical setting, so he set his sights on the Black Hills of the Old West.

18. The unifier of Deadwood (and America) is gold.

Getty Images

How do you transform chaos into society? According to Milch, mankind does so by rallying around a "totem of the leader." For Deadwood, that totem is gold. Those who have it rule those who want it. "Agreeing on this single symbol of value has allowed us to organize our individual energies on a wider scale," he has explained. As the place where the last of the great gold strikes occurred, Deadwood seemed the perfect place to show how gold and our accepted value of it could forge a civilization.

19. Though many of Deadwood's curse words may be anachronistic, cursing itself was not.

Milch was dedicated to getting the tone of the Black Hills right. It was a dangerous and gruff place where men toiled, fought, and cursed. But the curse words of the 1870s would seem downright laughable today, even with the glowering Ian McShane delivering them. So "tarnation" and "goldarn" were swapped out for contemporary cursing's heavy hitters, even though the f-word didn't come into popularity until the 1920s.

20. A lot of F-bombs were dropped—but not as many per minute as The Wolf of Wall Street had.

Paramount Pictures

Along with being praised for being an impeccably written show with outstanding performances, Deadwood earned attention for its aggressive use of the f-word. According to one dedicated viewer, the entire series clocked in with 2980 uses of the word. While that beats out Martin Scorsese's curse-laden white-collar crime drama's 569 uses, The Wolf of Wall Street wins when you break it down by uses-per-minute, boasting 3.16 to Deadwood's 1.56.

21. Timothy Olyphant's mom was not a fan of the series.

When her son was first cast as Deadwood's reluctant sheriff Seth Bullock, Mrs. Olyphant was thrilled her boy would be in a Western. Then she saw the first episode and was turned off by all the violence and coarse language. "I told all the ladies at church you were finally gonna be in something they could watch," she told Olyphant, "and now I've got to call them all back."

22. W. Earl Brown found his inspiration for Dan Dority close to home.

Deadwood's Dan Dority is Swearengen's right-hand man in many respects. The same was true in real life, where both Dority and Johnny Burns worked as general manager and floor manager of Swearengen's saloon. But in his portrayal of Dan, Brown found inspiration in his uncle.

"He doesn't like to hear it," Brown confessed, "but I tell him, 'I get up there and I pretend I'm you.'" As a tough Kentuckian with a past full of fights, his uncle proved a great starting point for the character. From there, Brown considers Dan "an animal walking upright" until he met Swearengen, who gave him a path and a home in Deadwood.

23. A Bella Union Babe sinks into the tub in the opening credits.

Zero Alpha, YouTube

Though we never saw her face, Badass Digest uncovered the identity of this beautiful bather. Bethalyn Staples was one of 20 actresses cast as background extras to play the prostitutes of the Gem and The Bella Union. Staples was selected for Cy's Bella Union. But after production wrapped on season one, she was called back for some second unit shoots for the opening credits.

"I had no idea that I was going to be getting into a bathtub until just before we set up the shot," she said. "It was as no-frills as it gets. They literally set a garden hose out in the sun to get warm so that the water wouldn't be cold when I got into the tub in a barn. We shot the scene in a hurry because we were losing the natural light that was shining through the window. My directions were probably the easiest I've ever received. Simply, sink into the tub as slowly as you can while still making it look natural. A few takes and that was it. When the series debuted, I was astonished by how gorgeous it looked."

24. David Milch rejected HBO's offer for a fourth season.

Deadwood fans reeled when news of the show's cancelation came just ahead of its season three premiere in the spring of 2006. Common speculation has laid the blame at the feet of Milch's then-greenlit John From Cincinnati; however, Milch himself admitted HBO offered a six-episode order for season four. But he turned it down, saying, "For my part, I did not want to accept a short order. We couldn’t have done the work the way we wanted. I didn’t want to limp home. My old man used to say, ‘Never go anyplace where you’re only tolerated.’”

25. Deadwood rose again in 2019.

Not long after Deadwood's finale aired, rumors of movie specials that would tie up the loose threads left behind by season three popped up. But hope for a long-awaited and craved finale dwindled to dust as time passed, especially in 2009, when McShane told The Daily Show With Jon Stewart, "No hope. That's dead." Milch confirmed this sad news himself in 2012, admitting, "We got really close about a year ago. Never say never, but it doesn’t look that way."

But in early 2017, reports began to surface that Milch was working on a script for a Deadwood movie. In April of that year, a number of outlets began reporting that Milch had finished the script and turned it in to HBO. McShane, too, confirmed the news, telling TVLine that a “two-hour movie script has been delivered to HBO. If they don’t deliver [a finished product], blame them.”

In 2018, HBO officially confirmed that the movie was a go. Deadwood: The Movie premiered on May 31, 2019.

This article has been updated for 2019.

10 of the Best Indoor and Outdoor Heaters on Amazon

Mr. Heater/Amazon
Mr. Heater/Amazon

With the colder months just around the corner, you might want to start thinking about investing in an indoor or outdoor heater. Indoor heaters not only provide a boost of heat for drafty spaces, but they can also be a money-saver, allowing you to actively control the heat based on the rooms you’re using. Outdoor heaters, meanwhile, can help you take advantage of cold-weather activities like camping or tailgating without having to call it quits because your extremities have gone numb. Check out this list of some of Amazon’s highest-rated indoor and outdoor heaters so you can spend less time shivering this winter and more time enjoying what the season has to offer.

Indoor Heaters

1. Lasko Ceramic Portable Heater; $20

Lasko/Amazon

This 1500-watt heater from Lasko may only be nine inches tall, but it can heat up to 300 square feet of space. With 11 temperature settings and three quiet settings—for high heat, low heat, and fan only—it’s a dynamic powerhouse that’ll keep you toasty all season long.

Buy it: Amazon

2. Alrocket Oscillating Space Heater; $25

Alrocket/Amazon

Alrocket’s oscillating space heater is an excellent addition to any desk or nightstand. Using energy-saving ceramic technology, this heater is made of fire-resistant material, and its special “tip-over” safety feature forces it to turn off if it falls over (making it a reliable choice for homes with kids or pets). It’s extremely quiet, too—at only 45 dB, it’s just a touch louder than a whisper. According to one reviewer, this an ideal option for a “very quiet but powerful” heater.

Buy it: Amazon

3. De’Longhi Oil-Filled Radiator Space Heather; $79

De’Longhi/Amazon

If you prefer a space heater with a more old-fashioned vibe, this radiator heater from De’Longhi gives you 2020 technology with a vintage feel. De’Longhi’s heater automatically turns itself on when the temperatures drops below 44°F, and it will also automatically turn itself off if it starts to overheat. Another smart safety feature? The oil system is permanently sealed, so you won’t have to worry about accidental spills.

Buy it: Amazon

4. Aikoper Ceramic Tower Heater; $70

Aikoper/Amazon

Whether your room needs a little extra warmth or its own heat source, Aikoper’s incredibly precise space heater has got you covered. With a range of 40-95°F, it adjusts by one-degree intervals, giving you the specific level of heat you want. It also has an option for running on an eight-hour timer, ensuring that it will only run when you need it.

Buy it: Amazon

5. Isiler Space Heater; $37

Isiler/Amazon

For a space heater that adds a fun pop of color to any room, check out this yellow unit from Isiler. Made from fire-resistant ceramic, Isiler’s heater can start warming up a space within seconds. It’s positioned on a triangular stand that creates an optimal angle for hot air to start circulating, rendering it so effective that, as one reviewer put it, “This heater needs to say ‘mighty’ in its description.”

Buy it: Amazon

Outdoor Heaters

6. Mr. Heater Portable Buddy; $104

Mr. Heater/Amazon

Make outdoor activities like camping and grilling last longer with Mr. Heater’s indoor/outdoor portable heater. This heater can connect to a propane tank or to a disposable cylinder, allowing you to keep it in one place or take it on the go. With such a versatile range of uses, this heater will—true to its name—become your best buddy when the temperature starts to drop.

Buy it: Amazon

7. Hiland Pyramid Patio Propane Heater; Various

Hiland/Amazon

The cold’s got nothing on this powerful outdoor heater. Hiland’s patio heater has a whopping 40,000 BTU output, which runs for eight to 10 hours on high heat. Simply open the heater’s bottom door to insert a propane tank, power it on, and sit back to let it warm up your backyard. The bright, contained flame from the propane doubles as an outdoor light.

Buy it: Amazon

8. Solo Stove Bonfire Pit; $345

Solo Stove/Amazon

This one is a slight cheat since it’s a bonfire pit and not a traditional outdoor heater, but the Solo Stove has a 4.7-star rating on Amazon for a reason. Everything about this portable fire pit is meticulously crafted to maximize airflow while it's lit, from its double-wall construction to its bottom air vents. These features all work together to help the logs burn more completely while emitting far less smoke than other pits. It’s the best choice for anyone who wants both warmth and ambiance on their patio.

Buy it: Amazon

9. Dr. Infrared Garage Shop Heater; $119

Dr. Infrared/Amazon

You’ll be able to use your garage or basement workshop all season long with this durable heater from Dr. Infrared. It’s unique in that it includes a built-in fan to keep warm air flowing—something that’s especially handy if you need to work without wearing gloves. The fan is overlaid with heat and finger-protectant grills, keeping you safe while it’s powered on.

Buy it: Amazon

10. Mr. Heater 540 Degree Tank Top; $86

Mr. Heater/Amazon

Mr. Heater’s clever propane tank top automatically connects to its fuel source, saving you from having to bring any extra attachments with you on the road. With three heat settings that can get up to 45,000 BTU, the top can rotate 360 degrees to give you the perfect angle of heat you need to stay cozy. According to a reviewer, for a no-fuss outdoor heater, “This baby is super easy to light, comes fully assembled … and man, does it put out the heat.”

Buy it: Amazon

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Why Steve Carell Was Anxious About Being in The Office Finale

Steve Carell was a bit apprehensive about appearing in the series finale.
Steve Carell was a bit apprehensive about appearing in the series finale.
NBC

Even though fans of The Office were sad to say goodbye to Steve Carell and the employees at Dunder Mifflin when the series went off the air in 2013, a lot of new content related to the hit comedy has come out in recent years.

Not only can fans reminisce about The Office with actresses Angela Kinsey (Angela Martin) and Jenna Fischer (Pam Beesly) on their podcast Office Ladies, but Kevin Malone actor Brian Baumgartner has also started his own podcast about the show as well.

Baumgartner’s podcast, titled An Oral History of The Office, offers listeners a chance to learn how the American version of the mockumentary comedy was developed. From conception to casting, An Oral History of The Office gives longtime fans an in-depth look at how their favorite paper-pushers came to be.

As PopSugar reports, Baumgartner’s 12-episode podcast has featured guest appearances from other actors that were on the show. Carell, John Krasinski, Rainn Wilson, Fischer, and Kinsey have all dropped in to talk about their days in Scranton.

For episode 11 of the podcast, titled “It’s a Wrap,” Baumgartner spoke with Carell and The Office creator Greg Daniels about the actor's surprise appearance in the series finale.

Longtime fans of the show will recall that Michael Scott left Dunder Mifflin to move to Colorado with Holly (played by Amy Ryan) in the finale of season 7. The podcast revealed that Carell was actually hesitant to return for the season 9 finale.

You can read an excerpt from the interview below:

Brian Baumgartner:

Greg wanted the finale to be a giant family reunion, and any office reunion wouldn’t be complete without Steve Carell. And had that been in the works for a while, between you and Steve, or did you go to him and he immediately said, yes, I’ll come back?

Greg Daniels:

Well, I think he was really anxious that it not be all about him. Like he was like, everybody who put in these other two years, this is the end of the show. This is the end of all of their stories. I left, this isn’t all about me. So he didn’t want to do too much. Uh, and you know, he had thoughts on how, what would draw him back to the situation. And he really liked the idea of coming back for Dwight’s wedding. Like he thought the character learned something, so he didn’t need self-promotion. At this point, he didn’t need to come back to be on the documentary. He came back for his friend Dwight.

Brian Baumgartner:

Steve said there had to be a reason.

Steve Carell:

Because I had told Greg, I just don’t think it’s a good idea because I felt like Michael’s story had definitely ended. And I was reticent about coming back because you guys had two more, really valuable seasons and that was everyone else’s ending. Michael had already had his, so I just didn’t want to, but at the same time, I felt like I should out of respect for all of you guys and out of my love for everybody to, you know, to acknowledge the, uh, the ending of this thing.

You can listen to the full episode here.