The 20 Most Popular Pedigreed Cat Breeds in America

iStock.com/Arx0nt
iStock.com/Arx0nt

The flat-faced, wide-eyed Exotic has been named America’s most popular pedigreed cat breed. This round-up of the country’s most coveted kitties comes from The Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA), which operates the world’s largest registry of pedigreed cats. The list was created based on cats that registered with the association over the course of a year—and what better day to share their findings than today, National Cat Day? (An even better way to celebrate the occasion? Head to your nearest pet shelter and adopt a fuzzy feline of your own.)

With a name like Exotic, it’s perhaps no surprise that this feline is in such demand. They’re still a fairly new breed, having emerged in the 1950s or 1960s, when breeders mated American Shorthair cats with silver, green-eyed Persians.

Although they look similar to Persians, they’re not quite as high-maintenance. Their fur doesn't shed as much, and they only require a weekly brushing. “The Exotic is bred to meet the Persian standard in every way with one very special exception: the coat,” the CFA says. “The thick, plush, short coat gives the Exotic a soft, rounded, teddy bear look.”

Ragdolls, which also emerged in the ‘60s, are the second most beloved breed among cat connoisseurs. These lap cats are known for their friendly personalities, brilliant blue eyes, large size, and silky fur. They’re also incredibly docile, and were supposedly named for the way their bodies go limp—like a rag doll—when they’re picked up.

Third on the list is the British Shorthair, which has been around far longer than the previously mentioned breeds. In fact, they’re one of the world’s oldest cat breeds, having descended from felines that were brought to Rome via ancient Egypt. They were worshipped by ancient civilizations, and continue to be worshipped by modern-day fur parents.

Does your fancy feline make the list? Check out the top 20 breeds below, courtesy of the CFA.

1. Exotic
2. Ragdoll
3. British Shorthair
4. Persian
5. Maine Coon
6. American Shorthair
7. Scottish Fold
8. Sphynx
9. Devon Rex
10. Abyssinian
11. Oriental
12. Siamese
13. Cornish Rex
14. Norwegian Forest
15. Siberian
16. Birman
17. Russian Blue
18. Bengal
19. Tonkinese
20. Burmese

This Outdoor Lantern Will Keep Mosquitoes Away—No Bug Spray Necessary

Thermacell, Amazon
Thermacell, Amazon

With summer comes outdoor activities, and with those activities come mosquito bites. If you're one of the unlucky people who seem to attract the insects, you may be tempted to lock yourself inside for the rest of the season. But you don't have to choose between comfort and having a cocktail on the porch, because this lamp from Thermacell ($25) keeps outdoor spaces mosquito-free without the mess of bug spray.

The device looks like an ordinary lantern you would display on a patio, but it works like bug repellent. When it's turned on, a fuel cartridge in the center provides the heat needed to activate a repellent mat on top of the lamp. Once activated, the repellent in the mat creates a 15-by-15-foot bubble of protection that repels any mosquitos nearby, making it a great option for camping trips, days by the pool, and backyard barbecues.

Mosquito repellent lantern.

Unlike some other mosquito repellents, this lantern is clean, safe, and scent-free. It also provides light like a real lamp, so you can keep pests away without ruining your backyard's ambience.

The Thermacell mosquito repellent lantern is now available on Amazon. If you've already suffered your first mosquito bites of the summer, here's some insight into why that itch can be so excruciating.

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Study: Women Are Less Attracted to Men Who Have Cats In Their Dating Profile Pics

Cats can ruin a relationship before it even gets started, according to science.
Cats can ruin a relationship before it even gets started, according to science.
Arx0nt/iStock via Getty Images

Numerous strategies and tips exist for putting your best foot forward in an online dating profile. You should be seen with friends, enjoying the outdoors, and maybe in a snapshot with your beloved pooch. But if you’re a man seeking a woman, it might be inadvisable to post a picture of you and your cat.

That’s the conclusion of researchers at Colorado State University and Boise State University, who published their findings in the journal Animals. In two surveys, more than 1300 heterosexual women aged 18 to 24 were shown photos of two men, aged 20 and 21, who posed for photos with and without a cat in their arms. In a questionnaire, the women assessed the men on perceived attributes like personality, masculinity, femininity, and “dateability.”

Cradling a cat had a negative impact across the board. In the first survey, when one of the men was feline-free, 38 percent of 708 respondents said they were likely or very likely to be receptive to a casual dating dynamic. A serious relationship was on the table for 37 percent. But with the cat in the picture, those warm feelings dropped to just 33 percent. Women who responded they would never be interested rose from 9 percent after viewing non-cat images to 14 percent when a furry friend appeared.

The man in the other survey fared no better, with 40 percent of 680 respondents uninterested in a date when he was alone compared to 45 percent when he was holding his pet. A serious relationship was a no-go for 41 percent of women, with the number rising to 45 percent when presented with the man and his cat.

Ultimately, the women found the photos of men with cats to signal the men were more neurotic, less masculine, and less desirable from a dating standpoint. But nearly half of respondents self-identified as dog lovers, which might indicate some pet biases are at work.

A photo of a man posing with cat, of course, does not exclude a love of dogs, nor does the absence of a pet indicate a preference for either cats or dogs. But the survey does seem to provide evidence that the very presence of a cat will lead to some unfavorable assumptions. If you've been unlucky in online love, it may not be you. It might be your fluffball.

[h/t CNN]