French Cheer British Royals on State Visit

Getty Images
Getty Images

The First World War was an unprecedented catastrophe that killed millions and set the continent of Europe on the path to further calamity two decades later. But it didn’t come out of nowhere. With the centennial of the outbreak of hostilities coming up in August, Erik Sass will be looking back at the lead-up to the war, when seemingly minor moments of friction accumulated until the situation was ready to explode. He'll be covering those events 100 years after they occurred. This is the 114th installment in the series.

April 21–24, 1914: French Cheer British Royals on State Visit

After a millennium of rivalry, in the first years of the 20th century France and Britain put aside their age-old differences and embraced each other in the “Entente Cordiale” (friendly understanding)—less out of some newfound appreciation of each other’s qualities than their shared fear of Germany. But the friendship was real enough, as demonstrated by the rapturous welcome for King George V and Queen Mary when the royal couple paid a state visit to France from April 21 to 24, 1914.

The Anglo-French relationship had always been complicated, to say the least, characterized over the centuries by equal parts antagonism and admiration. Even when diplomatic relations were at their worst, the British elite venerated French culture and cuisine, and it was de rigueur for educated aristocrats to drop French phrases in casual conversation and have a French-speaking governess for their children. On the other side many French admired Britain’s representative government, commercial success, and world-straddling empire—and even, on occasion, English aesthetics (in the 18th century English gardens were all the craze in French landscape design).

Under the Third Republic the democratic French also displayed a certain sentimental fondness for the British royal family, especially among French monarchists nostalgic for the lost glories of their own Bourbon dynasty. This fascination with the British royals was on full display during the official state visit of George V, who was greeted by huge crowds of cheering French citizens everywhere he went during the three-day stay in France.

After crossing the English Channel in the royal yacht with an escort of British and French warships, the royal couple proceeded from Calais to Paris, where they arrived via the Avenue du Bois de Boulogne in the late afternoon, and were officially greeted by President Poincare along with other high officials including the President of the Senate, the President of the Chamber of Deputies, and all the French government ministers. After a visit to the Foreign Ministry President Poincare and the French First Lady hosted the royal couple at a state dinner at the Elysee Palace.

The following day the king and queen were accompanied by President Poincare and the First Lady to the parade ground at Vincennes, where they reviewed French troops, followed by an official reception at the Hôtel de Ville, the city hall of Paris, and then a state dinner with the President and First Lady hosted by the royal couple and foreign secretary Edward Grey at the British Embassy. The royal couple also attended the Paris Opéra, where they were received with rapturous applause. Finally the next day was filled with more informal pursuits, including a visit to the horse races at the Auteuil Hippodrome.

The royal couple made a very favorable impression with their “common touch,” which pleased the egalitarian French then just as it did four decades years later, when Roland Barthes wrote about the phenomenon of “The ‘Blue Blood’ Cruise.” Thus French newspapers reported that the king cheerfully drank a toast with everyone who approached him at the Hôtel de Ville, and L’Illustration, a weekly magazine, outdid itself with breathless praise for the king’s humility and magnanimity.

In the background was always the issue of security, meaning the German menace, as President Poincare obliquely hinted in his effusive official address on April 21: “After a long rivalry which had taught them imperishable lessons of esteem and mutual respect, France and Great Britain have learnt to be friends, to approximate their thoughts and to unite their efforts… I do not doubt that, under the auspices of your Majesty and your Government, these ties of intimacy will be daily strengthened, to the great profit of civilization and of universal peace. This is the very sincere wish I express in the name of France.”

But beneath the flowery rhetoric a great deal of ambiguity remained in the Anglo-French relationship, as there was still no formal treaty of alliance between them, leaving it to British discretion whether they would take France’s side in the event of war with Germany. It was by no means certain that they would.

A week later, on April 28, 1914, Grey seemed to throw a bucket of cold water on French hopes when a member of Parliament asked him “whether the policy of this country still remains one of freedom from all obligations to engage in military operations on the Continent.” In reply the foreign secretary coolly referred back to a statement by Prime Minister Asquith the previous year, to the effect that, “As has been repeatedly stated, this country is not under any obligation not public and known to Parliament which compels it to take part in any war.”

See the previous installment or all entries.

Space Force: The Office's Greg Daniels and Steve Carell Aren't in Scranton Anymore

Steve Carell stars in Greg Daniels's Space Force.
Steve Carell stars in Greg Daniels's Space Force.
Aaron Epstein/Netflix

Greg Daniels and Steve Carell helped to make TV history when they collaborated on NBC's The Office. Now they've teamed up again for a brand-new show—and they're clearly not in Scranton anymore.

Daniels, who developed the American adaptation of The Office and co-created Parks and Recreation, is back with another workplace comedy—this time for Netflix and taking place in space. Space Force will follow Carell as the protagonist, and also stars big-name actors such as Ben Schwartz, Lisa Kudrow, and John Malkovich. As the title indicates, it's believed to be a spoof on Donald Trump's military branch of the same name.

This week, the first official images for Space Force were released, showing Carell and his co-stars in action—and it appears the beloved actor will have his hands full as the head of the Space Force.

In addition to starring in the series, Carell is also its co-creator (alongside Daniels) and one of its executive producers. Space Force will arrive on Netflix on May 29, 2020. In the meantime, you can check out some of the early images from the series below.

John Malkovich stars in Space Force
Aaron Epstein/Netflix

Steve Carell and Lisa Kudrow in 'Space Force'
Aaron Epstein/Netflix

Jimmy O. Yang in Space Force
Aaron Epstein/Netflix

Steve Carell and Ben Schwartz in 'Space Force'
Aaron Epstein/Netflix

YouTube Will Air a Different Andrew Lloyd Webber Musical for Free Each Friday

Broadway legend Andrew Lloyd Webber in 2018.
Broadway legend Andrew Lloyd Webber in 2018.
Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

Broadway may have temporarily shut down all productions to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus, but Andrew Lloyd Webber is here to make sure that musical theater aficionados still get their fill of top-notch content for the foreseeable future.

According to Broadway Direct, Webber’s production company, The Really Useful Group, has partnered with Universal on a new YouTube channel called “The Shows Must Go On!,” which will air a different Webber musical each Friday at 2 p.m. EST on YouTube. If you can’t tune in right at that time, don’t worry—the show will stay posted for 48 hours after it airs.

The series debuted last Friday, April 3, with 1999’s Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which stars Donny Osmond in the titular role and an ultra-talented supporting cast with Richard Attenborough, Maria Friedman, Joan Collins, and more. This week’s offering, tying in nicely with Easter, will be the 2012 Live Arena Tour of Jesus Christ Superstar, featuring Tim Minchin, Melanie C—a.k.a. the Spice Girls’ Sporty Spice—and Ben Forster. (If you’re interested in comparing it with 2018’s live concert version with John Legend and Sara Bareilles, you can catch that on NBC this Sunday.)

The schedule for future Fridays hasn’t been released yet, but Webber did mention in the announcement that it’ll include what he calls “the most important one, my disaster musical, By Jeeves,” a 1975 production based on P.G. Wodehouse’s classic stories. Other potential productions that could be part of the series include The Phantom of the Opera, Evita, School of Rock, and, of course, Cats.

In addition to full-length Broadway musicals, the channel will also post individual songs and behind-the-scenes content about how musicals go from stage to screen. You can subscribe to the channel here so you don’t miss any opportunity for a living room singalong.

[h/t Broadway Direct]

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