6 Facts About International Women's Day

robeo/iStock via Getty Images
robeo/iStock via Getty Images

For more than 100 years, March 8th has marked what has come to be known as International Women's Day in countries around the world. While its purpose differs from place to place—in some countries it's a day of protest, in others it's a way to celebrate the accomplishments of women and promote gender equality—the holiday is more than just a simple hashtag. Ahead of this year's celebration, let's take a moment to explore the day’s origins and traditions.

1. International Women's Day originated more than 100 years ago.

German Communist leader Clara Zetkin (1857 - 1933), known as Red Clara, and a companion
German Communist leader Clara Zetkin with a companion.
General Photographic Agency, Getty Images

On February 28, 1909, the now-dissolved Socialist Party of America organized the first National Woman's Day, which took place on the last Sunday in February. In 1910, Clara Zetkin—the leader of Germany’s 'Women's Office' for the Social Democratic Party—proposed the idea of a global International Women's Day, so that people around the world could celebrate at the same time. On March 19, 1911, the first International Women's Day was held; more than 1 million people in Germany, Switzerland, Austria, and Denmark took part.

2. The celebration got women the vote in Russia.

Women marching during the Russian Revolution in 1917, demanding the right to vote.
Women marching during the Russian Revolution in 1917, demanding the right to vote.
Keystone, Getty Images

In 1917, women in Russia honored the day by beginning a strike for "bread and peace" as a way to protest World War I and advocate for gender parity. Czar Nicholas II, the country's leader at the time, was not impressed and instructed General Khabalov of the Petrograd Military District to put an end to the protests—and to shoot any woman who refused to stand down. But the women wouldn't be intimidated and continued their protests, which led the Czar to abdicate just days later. The provisional government then granted women in Russia the right to vote.

3. The United Nations officially adopted International Women's Day in 1975.

International Women's Day demonstrations in Italy
International Women's Day demonstrations in Italy.
GoodLifeStudio/iStock via Getty Images

In 1975, the United Nations—which had dubbed the year International Women's Year—celebrated International Women's Day on March 8th for the first time. Since then, the UN has become the primary sponsor of the annual event and has encouraged even more countries around the world to embrace the holiday and its goal of celebrating "acts of courage and determination by ordinary women who have played an extraordinary role in the history of their countries and communities."

4. International Women's Day is an official holiday in dozens of countries.

Afghan women attend a ceremony to mark International Women's Day, on March 8, 2010 in Herat, Afghanistan
Women attend a ceremony to mark International Women's Day in Herat, Afghanistan.
Majid Saeedi, Getty Images

International Women's Day is a day of celebration around the world, and an official holiday in dozens of countries. Afghanistan, Cuba, Vietnam, Uganda, Mongolia, Georgia, Laos, Cambodia, Armenia, Belarus, Montenegro, Russia, and Ukraine are just some of the places where March 8th is recognized as an official holiday.

5. International Women's Day is a combined celebration with Mother's Day in several places.

Celebrating International Women's Day with flowers and gifts
Celebrating International Women's Day with flowers and gifts.
viktoriyabulyga/iStock via Getty Images

In the same way that Mother's Day doubles as a sort of women's appreciation day, the two holidays are combined in some countries, including Serbia, Albania, Macedonia, and Uzbekistan. On this day, children present their mothers and grandmothers with small gifts and tokens of love and appreciation.

6. Each year's International Women's Day festivities have an official theme.

International Women's Day March 8th
WD Stuart/iStock via Getty Images

In 1996, the UN created a theme for that year's International Women's Day: Celebrating the Past, Planning for the Future. In 1997, it was "Women at the Peace Table," then "Women and Human Rights" in 1998. They've continued this themed tradition in the years since; for 2020, it's "Let's all be each for equal" or #EachforEqual.

A New Ruth Bader Ginsburg Bobblehead Is Available for Pre-Order

The National Bobblehead Hall of Fame and Museum
The National Bobblehead Hall of Fame and Museum

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The late Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a devout champion for feminism and civil rights, and her influence stretched from the halls of the Supreme Court to the forefront of popular culture, where she affectionately became known as the Notorious RBG. Though there are plenty of public tributes planned for Ginsburg in the wake of her passing, the National Bobblehead Hall of Fame and Museum has a new RBG bobblehead ($25) available for pre-order so you can honor her in your own home.

There are two versions of the bobblehead available, one of Ginsburg smiling and another with a more serious expression. Not only do the bobbleheads feature her in her Supreme Court black robe, but eagle-eyed fans will see she is wearing one for her iconic coded collars and her classic earrings.

RBG is far from the only American icon bobblehead that the Hall of Fame store has produced in such minute detail. They also have bobbleheads of Abraham Lincoln ($30), Theodore Roosevelt ($30), Alexander Hamilton ($30), and dozens of others.

For more information on the RBG bobblehead, head here. Shipments will hopefully be sent out by December 2020 while supplies last.

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Fun Fact: More Than 75 National Forests Will Let You Chop Down Your Own Christmas Tree

Want a holiday tree? Drop by your nearest national forest.
Want a holiday tree? Drop by your nearest national forest.
Artem Baliaikin, Pexels

While plenty of people celebrate the holiday season with a neat and tidy artificial Christmas tree, there’s nothing quite like having the smell of fresh evergreen fir needles littering your floor. But before you head to your nearest tree farm or Walmart, think about a national forest instead. More than 75 of them will let you chop your own tree. Best of all, it’s actually good for the forests.

The United States Forest Service encourages people to grab a holiday tree from their land because it means less competition for room and sunlight for the remaining trees and allows wildlife to flourish. All you have to do is find your nearest national forest at Recreation.gov and apply for a permit—usually $10 or so—to begin chopping. The Forest Service recommends selecting trees no larger than 12 to 15 feet in height, with a 6-inch trunk diameter. They usually ask that you select a tree roughly 200 feet away from roads or campgrounds and make sure you let someone know where you’re going in case you get lost.

Different forests have different species of trees and slightly different rules, so it’s best to check with the forest for their guidelines before you rev up the chainsaw. And no, tree traffickers, you can’t harvest trees for resale.

[h/t CNN]