5 Fast Facts About the World Wide Web on Its 30th Birthday

iStock.com/mactrunk
iStock.com/mactrunk

Though the World Wide Web has only been around for a few decades, it's practically impossible to imagine life without it today. In honor of its 30th birthday—a milestone celebrated by today's Google Doodlehere are some facts about the system that keeps the world connected.

1. The World Wide Web was invented by Tim Berners-Lee in 1989.

Thirty years ago, CERN computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee proposed an idea for a database of hypertext links that would allow people to send data and communicate across a network. Berners-Lee wasn't looking to transform modern life when he invented the World Wide Web; he had just gotten tired of having to switch computers whenever he needed to access information that wasn't on his main work computer.

2. There's a difference between the internet and the World Wide Web.

Start of World Wide Web address on internet browser.
iStock.com/hayatikayhan

Though the terms are often used interchangeably, the internet and the World Wide Web are not the same. Many experts peg the start of the internet to September 2, 1969, when a team of computer scientists at UCLA got two computers to send data to each other through a network for the first time. Twenty years later, the World Wide Web made this technology user-friendly and accessible to the public.

3. The world's first website is still online.

Many websites from the early days of the Web have gone dark, but the first one is still live. Berners-Lee brought the site online from a lab in the Swiss Alps in 1991. Even though it looks primitive, the site has actually been updated from its original state several times.

4. The first image ever uploaded is very '90s.

In 1992, Berners-Lee needed a photo to test out the World Wide Web's new image-hosting capabilities. An IT developer shot a photograph of a comedy band, Les Horribles Cernettes, which was comprised of other CERN employees at the Swiss lab where they worked [PDF]. When the picture was uploaded, it made history as the first image ever shared on the Web.

5. Berners-Lee has mixed feelings about his invention today.

Over the past 30 years, Berners-Lee has watched his creation evolve into a force he could have never envisioned. In an open letter published to mark the World Wide Web's 30th birthday, he wrote, "while the web has created opportunity, given marginalized groups a voice, and made our daily lives easier, it has also created opportunity for scammers, given a voice to those who spread hatred, and made all kinds of crime easier to commit." He urged people to fight to minimize the negative consequences of the Web, such as harassment, polarizing discourse, and the spread of misinformation.

Veterans Can Now Access Their Health Records Through Apple’s Health App

SeventyFour/iStock via Getty Images
SeventyFour/iStock via Getty Images

Apple’s iOS Health app is great for more than just checking how many steps you took during a lengthy walk in the park—it also stores health records from Johns Hopkins, Quest Diagnostics, Allscripts, and more than 400 other healthcare organizations.

Now, Fortune reports that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has joined that list, making it easier than ever for military veterans who receive healthcare through the Veterans Health Administration to access all of their health records, including medications, immunizations, lab results, and other information. In the press release, Apple explains that the app will automatically update the records, so all veterans need to do is log into their providers’s patient portals through the Health app for a “single, integrated snapshot of their health profile whenever they want, quickly, and privately.”

apple VA health app screenshot
Apple

Though the official announcement coincides nicely with Veterans Day on Monday, the change itself has been in the works for several months—the VA released the new feature to certain patients over the summer.

According to its website, the Veterans Health Administration is the largest integrated healthcare system in the country, servicing more than 9 million patients across 1255 healthcare facilities. With such an expansive network, any successful attempt to streamline processes and improve the flow of information—especially when it comes to sensitive, personal data—has the potential to be a major game-changer for veterans.

apple VA health app screenshot
Apple

“Helping veterans gain a better understanding of their health is our chance to show our gratitude for their service,” Apple COO Jeff Williams said in the press release. “By working with the VA to offer Health Records on iPhone, we hope to help those who served have greater peace of mind that their healthcare is in good hands.”

Wondering what you can do to help veterans? Here are 11 honorable ideas.

[h/t Fortune]

Warning: Your Roku or Samsung Device Could Lose Access to Netflix Next Month

tcerovski/iStock via Getty Images
tcerovski/iStock via Getty Images

Owners of older Samsung TVs and Roku sticks may need to find a new way to binge-watch their favorite shows on Netflix next month. Starting December 1, the streaming service will no longer be compatible with the Roku 2100x, Roku 2050x, some Samsung smart TVs from 2010 and 2011, and other devices that don't support autoplay, Lifehacker reports.

Netflix hasn't shared many details about the reasons behind the change—just that they will result from "technical limitations." The issue seems to only impact devices that have trouble autoplaying episodes, so if you haven't noticed any content playing on its own while watching Netflix on your television, you may be affected.

Autoplay is one of the Netflix's least popular features. While the service allows you to customize many aspects of your user experience, there's no way to disable autoplay on the homepage. This latest news suggests that Netflix is choosing to ignore the complaints and double-down on the autoplay feature—a decision that will likely frustrate many subscribers who can no longer watch Stranger Things on their otherwise perfectly-working devices.

Netflix has yet to release an official list of the devices that will no longer support the app—just a warning that some users may see an error message that reads "Due to technical limitations, Netflix will no longer be available on this device after December 1, 2019." Fortunately, Samsung and Roku have been more forthcoming with details. Here's a list of some of the devices that will no longer be able to stream Netflix starting next month:

Roku 2000C
Roku 2050X
Roku 2100X
Roku HD
Roku SD
Roku XD
Roku XR
2010 and 2011 Samsung TVs with a C or D in the model code

[h/t Lifehacker]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER