Google Engineer Calculates Pi to 31 Trillion Digits, Sets New World Record

iStock.com/sovika
iStock.com/sovika

Pedantic math whizzes may insist that Pi Day should really be called Pi Approximation Day. The ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter is commonly shortened to 3.14, but the sequence is actually infinite. Just in time for Pi Day on March 14 (3/14), a Google engineer has set a new record for the most pi digits ever calculated, Business Insider reports.

The previous record for the known digits of pi stood at 22.4 trillion digits. As Google announced on Pi Day 2019, Emma Haruka Iwao, a cloud developer advocate who's been with the company for three years, has added 9 million digits to that figure.

Working out of a lab in Osaka, Japan, she used Google's cloud-computing service to crunch 170 terabytes of data. For comparison, a single terabyte can hold 40 days worth of video. The process required 25 virtual machines running the y-cruncher program over four months.

According to Google, this marks the first time cloud computing has been used to calculate a record number of pi digits. Haruka Iwao has been working on cracking new pi sequences since she first downloaded software to calculate the number on her home computer at age 12. She's the third woman to break the pi record, and she's interested in discovering even more digits.

Anyone can download the full sequence onto their computer from Google. Memorizing all 31,415,926,535,897 digits may be impossible, but you can memorize at least the first 100 with this basic technique.

[h/t Business Insider]

20 Black-and-White Facts About Penguins

iStock/fieldwork
iStock/fieldwork

Who is a penguin's favorite family member? Aunt Arctica! 

We kid! But seven of the 17 species of penguins can be found on the southernmost continent. Here are 20 more fun facts about these adorable tuxedoed birds. 

1. All 17 species of penguins are found exclusively in the Southern Hemisphere.

A group of penguins on an iceberg.
iStock/axily

2. Emperor Penguins are the tallest species, standing nearly 4 feet tall. The smallest is the Little Blue Penguin, which is only about 16 inches.

Three emperor penguins
iStock/Fabiano_Teixeira

3. The fastest species is the Gentoo Penguin, which can reach swimming speeds up to 22 mph.

A gentoo penguin swimming underwater
iStock/chameleonseye

4. A penguin's striking coloring is a matter of camouflage; from above, its black back blends into the murky depths of the ocean. From below, its white belly is hidden against the bright surface.

Penguins swimming in the ocean
iStock/USO

5. Fossils place the earliest penguin relative at some 60 million years ago, meaning an ancestor of the birds we see today survived the mass extinction of the dinosaurs.

Emperor penguins with chicks
iStock/vladsilver

6. Penguins ingest a lot of seawater while hunting for fish, but a special gland behind their eyes—the supraorbital gland—filters out the saltwater from their blood stream. Penguins excrete it through their beaks, or by sneezing.

Penguin swimming in the ocean
iStock/Musat

7. Unlike most birds—which lose and replace a few feathers at a time—penguins molt all at once, spending two or three weeks land-bound as they undergo what is called the catastrophic molt.

Gentoo penguin chick molting
iStock/ChristianWilkinson

8. All but two species of penguins breed in large colonies of up to one thousand birds.

A colony of king penguins
iStock/DurkTalsma

9. It varies by species, but many penguins will mate with the same member of the opposite sex season after season.

Two chinstrap penguins
iStock/Legacy-Images

10. Similarly, most species are also loyal to their exact nesting site, often returning to the same rookery in which they were born.

Magellanic penguin nesting in the ground
iStock/JeremyRichards

11. Some species create nests for their eggs out of pebbles and loose feathers. Emperor Penguins are an exception: They incubate a single egg each breeding season on the top of their feet. Under a loose fold of skin is a featherless area with a concentration of blood vessels that keeps the egg warm.

Penguin eggs
iStock/Buenaventuramariano

12. In some species, it is the male penguin which incubates the eggs while females leave to hunt for weeks at a time. Because of this, pudgy males—with enough fat storage to survive weeks without eating—are most desirable.

A group of emperor penguins and chick
iStock/vladsilver

13. Penguin parents—both male and female—care for their young for several months until the chicks are strong enough to hunt for food on their own.

Penguin chick and parent on a nest
iStock/golnyk

14. If a female Emperor Penguin's baby dies, she will often "kidnap" an unrelated chick.

Three emperor penguin chicks
iStock/AntAntarctic

15. Despite their lack of visible ears, penguins have excellent hearing and rely on distinct calls to identify their mates when returning to the crowded breeding grounds.

Gentoo penguins
iStock/Goddard_Photography

16. The first published account of penguins comes from Antonio Pigafetta, who was aboard Ferdinand Magellan's first circumnavigation of the globe in 1520. They spotted the animals near what was probably Punta Tombo in Argentina. (He called them "strange geese.")

A group of magellanic penguins on the seacoast
iStock/encrier

17. An earlier, anonymous diary entry from Vasco da Gama's 1497 voyage around the Cape of Good Hope makes mention of flightless birds as large as ducks.

A cape penguin in South Africa
iStock/ziggy_mars

18. Because they aren't used to danger from animals on solid ground, wild penguins exhibit no particular fear of human tourists.

Man videotaping a penguin in Antarctica
iStock/Bkamprath

19. Unlike most sea mammals—which rely on blubber to stay warm—penguins survive because their feathers trap a layer of warm air next to the skin that serves as insulation, especially when they start generating muscular heat by swimming around.

Penguin swimming in the ocean
iStock/Musat

20. In the 16th century, the word penguin actually referred to great auks (scientific name: Pinguinus impennis), a now-extinct species that inhabited the seas around eastern Canada. When explorers traveled to the Southern Hemisphere, they saw black and white birds that resembled auks, and called them penguins.

This story was first published in 2017.

Where You Can Watch All 21 Marvel Cinematic Universe Movies Right Now

Marvel Studios 2019
Marvel Studios 2019

Stressing out about catching up on all things Marvel before you head to the theater for the epic, three-hour Avengers: Endgame? The countdown for the highly anticipated film began a while ago, but if you’re still behind and need a refresher on all 21 MCU movies that came before it, here's where you can watch every Marvel movie right now (some of which you'll have to rent or buy).

  1. Iron Man (2008)

Where to stream it: Amazon, iTunes, YouTube

  1. The Incredible Hulk (2008)

Where to stream it: Amazon, DirecTV, iTunes, YouTube

  1. Iron Man 2 (2010)

Where to stream it: Amazon Prime, Epix, Hulu, iTunes, YouTube

  1. Thor (2011)

Where to stream it: Amazon, iTunes, YouTube

  1. Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)

Where to stream it: Amazon, iTunes, YouTube

  1. The Avengers (2012)

Where to stream it: Amazon, iTunes, YouTube

  1. Iron Man 3 (2013)

Where to stream it: Amazon, DirecTV, iTunes, YouTube

  1. Thor: The Dark World (2013)

Where to stream it: Amazon, Hulu, iTunes, YouTube

  1. Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014)

Where to stream it: Amazon, Hulu (with Live TV), iTunes, YouTube

  1. Guardians of the Galaxy (2014)

Where to stream it: Amazon, Hulu (with Live TV), iTunes, YouTube

  1. Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015)

Where to stream it: Amazon, Hulu (with Live TV), iTunes, YouTube

  1. Ant-Man (2015)

Where to stream it: Amazon, Hulu (with Live TV), iTunes, YouTube

  1. Captain America: Civil War (2016)

Where to stream it: Amazon, Hulu (with Live TV), iTunes, YouTube

  1. Doctor Strange (2016)

Where to stream it: Amazon, Hulu (with Live TV), iTunes, YouTube

  1. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017)

Where to stream it: Amazon, iTunes, Netflix, YouTube

  1. Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017)

Where to stream it: Amazon, DirecTV, iTunes, Netflix, Starz, YouTube

  1. Thor: Ragnarok (2017)

Where to stream it: Amazon, iTunes, Netflix, YouTube

  1. Black Panther (2018)

Where to stream it: Amazon, iTunes, Netflix, YouTube

  1. Avengers: Infinity War (2018)

Where to stream it: Amazon, iTunes, Netflix, YouTube

  1. Ant-Man and The Wasp (2018)

Where to stream it: Amazon, iTunes, Netflix, YouTube

And, if you’re up for heading to the cinema before Endgame, Captain Marvel is still in theaters.

With just a couple more days until Endgame comes out on April 26, we’ve all got a lot of streaming to do.

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