This Tick Collection in Georgia Contains Nearly Every Species Known to Science

iStock/Ladislav Kubeš
iStock/Ladislav Kubeš

It doesn't matter if they're wood ticks, deer ticks, or lone star ticks—most people try to avoid the blood-sucking parasites at all costs. But if you're the rare person who's interested in seeing ticks up close, the U.S. National Tick Collection at Georgia Southern University is the place to go.

According to Smithsonian, the collection boasts more than 1 million tick specimens representing most of the 860 known species of the arachnid. The diverse assortment includes familiar names—like the American dog tick, which is active throughout most of the country—as well as more obscure examples like Ixodes uriae—an Antarctic tick that feeds on seabirds. Some specimens are more notable for their unique backstories than their scientific labels: One tick in the collection was removed from Theodore Roosevelt's pet dog.

Unlike some other tick collections, the U.S. National Tick Collection has never stayed in one place for very long. It's had multiple homes, including Montana State University and the National Institutes of Health's Rocky Mountain Laboratories. It was donated to Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in 1983, and it's currently at Georgia Southern University on loan.

Though already massive, the collection is still growing thanks to acquisitions and fieldwork by entomologists. Having a comprehensive catalog of ticks at their disposal allows scientists to study the diseases the parasites spread. In 2018, nearly 60,000 cases of tickborne illnesses, including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, babesiosis, and Lyme disease, were reported to the CDC.

Preserved in jars of alcohol and stored in cabinets, the specimens in the U.S. National Tick Collection don't pose the same health threats as their live counterparts. The collection is available for students, researchers, and the public to view by appointment only.

[h/t Smithsonian]

Looking to Downsize? You Can Buy a 5-Room DIY Cabin on Amazon for Less Than $33,000

Five rooms of one's own.
Five rooms of one's own.
Allwood/Amazon

If you’ve already mastered DIY houses for birds and dogs, maybe it’s time you built one for yourself.

As Simplemost reports, there are a number of house kits that you can order on Amazon, and the Allwood Avalon Cabin Kit is one of the quaintest—and, at $32,990, most affordable—options. The 540-square-foot structure has enough space for a kitchen, a bathroom, a bedroom, and a sitting room—and there’s an additional 218-square-foot loft with the potential to be the coziest reading nook of all time.

You can opt for three larger rooms if you're willing to skip the kitchen and bathroom.Allwood/Amazon

The construction process might not be a great idea for someone who’s never picked up a hammer, but you don’t need an architectural degree to tackle it. Step-by-step instructions and all materials are included, so it’s a little like a high-level IKEA project. According to the Amazon listing, it takes two adults about a week to complete. Since the Nordic wood walls are reinforced with steel rods, the house can withstand winds up to 120 mph, and you can pay an extra $1000 to upgrade from double-glass windows and doors to triple-glass for added fortification.

Sadly, the cool ceiling lamp is not included.Allwood/Amazon

Though everything you need for the shell of the house comes in the kit, you will need to purchase whatever goes inside it: toilet, shower, sink, stove, insulation, and all other furnishings. You can also customize the blueprint to fit your own plans for the space; maybe, for example, you’re going to use the house as a small event venue, and you’d rather have two or three large, airy rooms and no kitchen or bedroom.

Intrigued? Find out more here.

[h/t Simplemost]

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The Reason Dogs Are Terrified of Thunderstorms—And How You Can Help

The face of a dog who clearly knows that a hard rain's a-gonna fall.
The face of a dog who clearly knows that a hard rain's a-gonna fall.
Charles Deluvio, Unsplash

Deafening thunder can be a little scary even for a full-grown human who knows it’s harmless, so your dog’s terror is understandable. But why exactly do thunderstorms send so many of our pawed pals into a tailspin?

Many dogs are distressed by unexpected loud noises—a condition known as noise aversion, or noise phobia in more severe cases—and sudden thunderclaps fall into that category. What separates a wailing siren or fireworks show from a thunderstorm in a dog's mind, however, is that dogs may actually realize a thunderstorm is coming.

As National Geographic explains, not only can dogs easily see when the sky gets dark and feel when the wind picks up, but they can also perceive the shift in barometric pressure that occurs before a storm. The anxiety of knowing loud noise is on its way may upset your dog as much as the noise itself.

Static electricity could also add to this anxiety, especially for dogs with long and/or thick hair. Tufts University veterinary behaviorist Nicholas Dodman, who also co-founded the Center for Canine Behavior Studies, told National Geographic that a static shock when brushing up against metal may heighten your dog’s agitation during a storm.

It’s difficult to nail down why each dog despises thunderstorms. As Purina points out, one could simply be thrown off by a break from routine, while another may be most troubled by the lightning. In any case, there are ways to help calm your stressed pet.

If your dog’s favorite spot during a storm is in the bathroom, they could be trying to stay near smooth, static-less surfaces for fear of getting shocked. Suiting them up in an anti-static jacket or petting them down with anti-static dryer sheets may help.

You can also make a safe haven for your pup where they’ll be oblivious to signs of a storm. Purina behavior research scientist Ragen T.S. McGowan suggests draping a blanket over their crate, which can help muffle noise. For dogs that don’t use (or like) crates, a cozy room with drawn blinds and a white noise machine can work instead.

Consulting your veterinarian is a good idea, too; if your dog’s thunderstorm-related stress is really causing issues, an anti-anxiety prescription could be the best option.

[h/t National Geographic]