NASA Boss Jokingly Declares Pluto a Planet, Gets Everyone's Hopes Up

NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

It's been 13 years since Pluto was demoted to dwarf planet—and fans of the celestial body are still not over it. Everyone from kids to respected astronomers have argued that Pluto deserves the title of the ninth planet in our solar system. As IFL Science reports, even the head of NASA has come out as Team Planet Pluto.

At a FIRST Robotics event on August 23, 2019, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine jokingly declared Pluto to be a planet again. “Just so you know, in my view, Pluto is a planet,” he said in a clip broadcast by NASA TV. “I’m sticking by that, it’s the way I learned it and I’m committed to it.”

Based on that soundbite, it's easy feel hopeful about Pluto's planetary status. But NASA doesn't set the standards for planets in our solar system: the International Astronomical Union (IAU) does. On August 24, 2006, the organization announced that Pluto didn't meet the new criteria used to define true planets. According to the IAU, a planet should orbit the sun, be spherical due to gravity, and be the dominant body in its orbit. Even though Pluto meets these first two requirements, its orbit overlaps with that of Neptune, which means it's not technically a planet in the IAU's view.

The ruling was hugely controversial, and not just because it contradicted what millions of people were taught in grade school. The amount of "cleared space" in its orbit, an indicator that differentiates planets from asteroids, is not easy to measure, and it was rarely used to define planets prior to 2006.

Even if it's not official, Bridenstine's declaration should at least validate the many Pluto supporters still fighting for the former planet's dignity.

[h/t IFL Science]

Keep Your Cat Busy With a Board Game That Doubles as a Scratch Pad

Cheerble
Cheerble

No matter how much you love playing with your cat, waving a feather toy in front of its face can get monotonous after a while (for the both of you). To shake up playtime, the Cheerble three-in-one board game looks to provide your feline housemate with hours of hands-free entertainment.

Cheerble's board game, which is currently raising money on Kickstarter, is designed to keep even the most restless cats stimulated. The first component of the game is the electronic Cheerble ball, which rolls on its own when your cat touches it with their paw or nose—no remote control required. And on days when your cat is especially energetic, you can adjust the ball's settings to roll and bounce in a way that matches their stamina.

Cheerable cat toy on Kickstarter.
Cheerble

The Cheerble balls are meant to pair with the Cheerble game board, which consists of a box that has plenty of room for balls to roll around. The board is also covered on one side with a platform that has holes big enough for your cat to fit their paws through, so they can hunt the balls like a game of Whack-a-Mole. And if your cat ever loses interest in chasing the ball, the board also includes a built-in scratch pad and fluffy wand toy to slap around. A simplified version of the board game includes the scratch pad without the wand or hole maze, so you can tailor your purchase for your cat's interests.

Cheerble cat board game.
Cheerble

Since launching its campaign on Kickstarter on April 23, Cheerble has raised over $128,000, already blowing past its initial goal of $6416. You can back the Kickstarter today to claim a Cheerble product, with $32 getting you a ball and $58 getting you the board game. You can make your pledge here, with shipping estimated for July 2020.

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Where to Watch SpaceX’s Historic Astronaut Launch Live

Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

SpaceX will make history today when it launches its first crewed spacecraft from Cape Canaveral, Florida, at 4:33 p.m. EDT. Powered by a Falcon 9 rocket, the Crew Dragon spacecraft will transport NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to the International Space Station, marking the company's first-ever crewed mission and the first crewed launch from the U.S. since 2011. If you want to watch the momentous event from home, there are plenty of ways to stream it live online.

Both SpaceX and NASA will be hosting livestreams of the May 27 launch. NASA's webcast kicks off at 12:15 p.m. EDT today with live looks at the Crew Dragon and Falcon 9 rocket at the Kennedy Space Center. The feed will continue streaming until late in the morning of Thursday, May 28, when the spacecraft is set to dock at the International Space Station. You can catch the coverage on NASA's website, its social media channels, or on the NASA TV channel through cable or satellite. SpaceX's stream also starts at 12:15 p.m. EDT, and it will be broadcast on the company's YouTube channel. (You can watch the video below).

Several television networks will be covering the event, with ABC and National Geographic airing "Launch America: Mission to Space Live" at 3 p.m., and Discovery and the Science Channel showing "Space Launch Live: America Returns to Space" at 2 p.m. If you're looking for more online streaming options, the American Museum of Natural History and Intrepid Museum in New York City will be hosting live events to celebrate the launch this afternoon on YouTube.

The launch has been scheduled down to the minute, but SpaceX still has time to change that depending on the weather. If today's launch doesn't happen according to plan, there are windows on May 30 and May 31 set aside for second attempts.

[h/t TechCrunch]