Where Do Cobwebs Come From?

S847/iStock via Getty Images
S847/iStock via Getty Images

It’s a hallmark Halloween decoration: Sticky, burdensome cobwebs that stretch across ceilings and walls, remnants of spider occupations gone by. Some homes don’t need the artificial version, with real cobwebs a persistent nuisance that requires perpetual prodding with a duster. Where do these cobwebs come from?

The term cobweb is used to describe any web spun by a member of the Theridiidae family of spiders, made up of a number of species that tend to be found in residential homes. But colloquially, people tend to use the phrase to refer to abandoned threads of webbing they wind up clearing with brooms. When in use, these cobwebs tend to be sticky but unstructured, lacking the amazing and intricate design of webs woven by other species. Spiders make webs in the hopes of trapping prey, but if one location isn’t proving fruitful, they’ll move to another. That—along with the death of the web owner—can lead to abandoned cobwebs that eventually fall apart, dangling listlessly from room corners, collecting and trapping dust.

It’s that flypaper characteristic that likely results in you noticing a cobweb for the first time. As particles accumulate, the cobweb becomes more visible. You may also notice single web strands in isolation. These are likely from a spider’s interior travels as they search for a place to settle in.

If you want to reduce the cobweb clutter, regular dusting will reduce both their visibility and their existence. You can also look for and seal cracks around windows or doorways that might provide access. Maybe wait until after Halloween, though.

[h/t realtor.com]

The Reason Your Local ALDI Grocery Store Doesn’t Have a Phone Number

Matthew Horwood/Getty Images
Matthew Horwood/Getty Images

ALDI’s streamlined layout, reliably low prices, and lack of name-brand products all make grocery shopping feel much less overwhelming and more personal than it often does at other stores. Having said that, you can’t exactly ring up your friendly neighborhood ALDI the way you would with many local grocery stores.

Search online for a nearby ALDI and you’ll notice that the same phone number is listed next to every location: (855) 955-2534. If you call that number, an automated voice says this:

“Thank you for contacting ALDI U.S. Due to our limited store staffing, the phone numbers for our stores are unlisted. This is part of our savings model that allows us to pass on significant savings to our customers.”

As Reader’s Digest explains, there are only three to five employees working in any given store at a time, and they’re focused on serving customers in person. With fewer workers on the payroll, ALDI can keep its prices as low as possible, directly benefiting customers.

In other words, the company doesn’t want to pay people to answer questions that customers could often answer themselves, since so much information is available on the internet these days. To make sure the answers really are easy to find, ALDI’s website boasts a robust FAQ section, featuring questions like “Why do I need a quarter to use a shopping cart at ALDI?” and “If you don’t have the brands I know, how can I be sure of the quality?” Other tabs include a list of product recalls, a section on Instacart delivery, and a store locator with each location's hours.

If you can’t find the information you’re looking for on the website, there is an option to contact ALDI via email, or call their corporate customer service line during regular business hours at (800) 325-7894.

[h/t Reader’s Digest]

The Reason Dogs Twitch in Their Sleep

Tetiana Garkusha/iStock via Getty Images
Tetiana Garkusha/iStock via Getty Images

The sight of a dog batting its tiny paws around while sleeping is irrefutably adorable, and it’s not hard to imagine that your beloved pet is dreaming of swimming, fetching a Frisbee, or bounding around the yard in pursuit of a scampering squirrel.

In truth, that’s pretty much exactly what’s going on. Dogs, like humans, dream during the REM cycle of sleep, and their twitches are responses to whatever’s happening in those dreams. Though all dogs can exhibit muscle movements while dreaming, PetMD reports that it most often affects younger and older dogs. This is because of the pons, a part of the brainstem with two “off” switches that regulate movement during the sleep cycle.

“If either or both of these ‘off’ switches is not fully developed or has grown weak due to the aging process, then the muscles are not completely turned off and during dreaming, the animal will start to move,” Stanley Coren, a neuropsychological researcher and former psychology professor at the University of British Columbia, told PetMD. “How much movement occurs depends upon how effective or ineffective these ‘off’ switches are.”

As long as your dog looks like it’s having a grand old time in its dreams, you can sit back and enjoy the show. If you think your dog might be having a nightmare, be careful about waking it up. As the American Kennel Club (AKC) explains, a dog woken abruptly from a bad dream might bite you before it realizes its distress wasn’t real.

You should, however, learn to recognize the difference between a normal dream and a seizure.

“Some [dogs] manifest dreaming with twitching, paddling, or kicks of the legs. These movements are often brief (less than 30 seconds) and intermittent,” Jerry Klein, the AKC’s chief veterinary officer, described on the AKC website. “Seizing dogs’ limbs, on the other hand, tend to be rigid and stiffer, with more violent movement.”

The seizure can also be accompanied by loss of bowel control. If that description sounds familiar, you should talk to your veterinarian.

[h/t PetMD]

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