15 Killer Facts About Predator

Twentieth Century Fox
Twentieth Century Fox

Before you “get to da choppa” and head out to see The Predator, how about you take a look at a few fun tidbits we found about Predator, the original Arnold Schwarzenegger action classic that started it all.

1. THE MOVIE WAS ALMOST TITLED HUNTER.

The name wasn't switched to Predator until after production.

2. THE PITCH FOR THE MOVIE NAME-DROPPED SOME RECOGNIZABLE HITS.


Twentieth Century Fox

In the film's DVD commentary, director John McTiernan shared that the film was pitched as “Rocky meets Alien," but McTiernan saw it more like King Kong: "Bunch of guys go to an island, and go deeper and deeper in, and shazam the thing they’re chasing turns out to be a lot bigger than they thought, and they have to turn around and run away!”

3. THE FILM WAS SHOT ENTIRELY ON LOCATION IN MEXICO.

The fictional jungles of Val Verde are actually locations in Puerto Vallarta and Palenque, Mexico. However, because the Mexican jungle is deciduous, tons of fake leaves had to be added to the trees in order to make the jungle seem lush and inescapable.

4. SHANE BLACK WAS CAST FOR HIS SCRIPT EXPERTISE, NOT HIS ACTING CHOPS.

Shane Black in 'Predator' (1987)
Twentieth Century Fox

Shane Black, who plays Hawkins, had previously written the screenplay for Lethal Weapon; he was covertly cast in the film so that he would be available to make on-the-fly and uncredited script changes while on set. Which makes it even more befitting that Black wrote and directed The Predator, the latest installment in the series.

5. THE LOOK OF THE COMMANDOS WAS BASED ON THE SGT. ROCK COMICS.

Hawkins can be seen reading a Sgt. Rock comic in the end credits (see above).

6. PREDATOR IS PROFESSIONAL WRESTLER JESSE VENTURA’S FIRST MOVIE.

Jesse Ventura and Bill Duke in 'Predator' (1987)
Twentieth Century Fox

Jesse Ventura would later serve as the Governor of Minnesota from 1999 to 2003.

7. “OLD PAINLESS” SHOT BLANKS…

… but was still extremely deadly. The GE M134 Minigun wielded by Ventura’s character didn’t shoot live rounds, but for safety reasons, the cast and crew were required to stand at least 50 feet away when it was fired.

8. THE PREDATOR’S HEAT VISION ISN’T ACTUALLY HEAT VISION.

The filmmakers attempted to use actual heat vision for the Predator, but the specific camera proved impractical for the on-location shoot. Instead, normal footage was made into a negative image in post-production and exaggerated “heat vision” colors were added to create the effect.

9. THE PREDATOR’S GREEN BLOOD WAS MADE FROM GLOW STICKS.

The filmmakers originally used an orange substance for the creature’s blood, figuring they would spiff it up with special effects in post-production. But the orange goop looked so bad on camera, they decided they had to make a change. They wound up using the luminescent liquid from the inside of glow sticks, which they bought over the counter.

10. JEAN-CLAUDE VAN DAMME WAS THE ORIGINAL GUY IN THE PREDATOR SUIT.

The “Muscles from Brussels” was reportedly fired from the movie because he complained too much about how uncomfortable the suit was.

11. THE ORIGINAL DESIGN FOR THE PREDATOR WAS SCRAPPED IN THE MIDDLE OF PRODUCTION.

The original suit resembled a lanky, bug-eyed insect, but McTiernan didn't think it was scary enough. He halted production on the entire movie so it could be redesigned. Arnold Schwarzenegger personally tapped effects wizard Stan Winston to revamp the Predator design. Winston had previously designed Schwarzenegger’s famous robot skeleton in The Terminator.

12. THE BREAK IN PRODUCTION WAS A BLESSING IN DISGUISE.

The stop in production to redesign the Predator allowed the filmmakers to edit an hour of the movie together to show to the studio. They liked it so much that they gave the production more money to create bigger action sequences in the last third of the movie once filming picked back up
again.

13. JAMES CAMERON PARTLY INSPIRED THE CREATURE’S NEW DESIGN.

While on a flight during the production of Aliens, Cameron mentioned to Winston (who was sketching ideas for the new Predator) that he’d always wanted to see a monster with mandibles. Winston added the oral appendages to the final drawing of the updated Predator.

14. THE UPDATED PREDATOR SUIT WAS NO PICNIC TO WEAR.

The fully functioning suit weighed upwards of 200 pounds, which was a lot of weight for Kevin Peter Hall, the seven-foot-tall ballet dancer, martial arts expert, and actor they brought on to replace Van Damme.

15. OPTIMUS PRIME AND THE PREDATOR HAVE THE SAME VOICE.

Peter Cullen, who is uncredited in Predator, provided the voice for both Optimus Prime and the Predator.

Friends's James Michael Tyler Says a Fan Theory on How the Characters Always Got their Seats at Central Perk Makes Sense

Warner Bros. Television/Getty Images
Warner Bros. Television/Getty Images

There are plenty of fan theories surrounding the hit sitcom Friends, including one that claims Rachel actually dreamed the entire show and another which suggests Phoebe was hallucinating the entire time. But even after the sitcom ended in 2004, there is one burning question that remains unanswered: How did the gang always manage to sit at the orange couch when they went to Central Perk?

The coffee shop is located in New York City, one of the most densely populated cities on the planet, so it seems pretty unlikely Monica, Ross, Joey, Phoebe, Rachel, and Chandler could get their spot every time they stopped in for their (many) cups of coffee. But according to Insider, Friends actor James Michael Tyler, who played Gunther, told RadioTimes there's one fan theory about it that "makes a lot of sense."

The theory suggests that Gunther was the reason the crew was always able to grab the couch. In some scenes, there's even a "reserved" sign on the coffee table in front of the orange sofa. Why would he purposely reserve the table? According to the theory, it's because of his enormous crush on Rachel.

While Tyler says he never personally placed the sign on the coffee table, he told RadioTimes, "That was probably one of the set designers, I'm guessing, maybe one of the writers … I'm not sure who was responsible for that. But I do remember seeing that." He continued, "It never really occurred to me why it was there, but it makes a lot of sense [that Gunther put it there] in retrospect."

Now that you have that question answered, learn why some fans think the crew's incessant coffee drinking was just a long Starbucks marketing ploy by heading here.

[h/t RadioTimes]

Roar—Tippi Hedren’s Wild Big Cat Movie From 1981—Will Soon Be Available to Stream

Tippi Hedren and Melanie Griffith with a couple of cool cats in 1982.
Tippi Hedren and Melanie Griffith with a couple of cool cats in 1982.
Central Press/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Decades before Joe Exotic amassed his frightening collection of big cats as seen in Netflix’s Tiger King, there was an even wilder personal zoo located in California—and owned by people you might already know.

Following a trip to a game preserve in Mozambique, Tippi Hedren, star of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds, and her filmmaker husband, Noel Marshall, decided to produce a movie about a scientist and his family coexisting with big cats. The cast would include the couple, Marshall’s sons John and Jerry, and Hedren’s daughter Melanie Griffith (who’d later become a film star herself and the mother of another one: Fifty Shades of Grey’s Dakota Johnson). They started raising lion cubs at their Sherman Oaks house in 1971, and soon moved to a larger property in Santa Clarita. By the time they began shooting in 1976, they had 132 lions, tigers, leopards, cougars, and jaguars. And one 5-ton bull elephant named Timbo.

The film, titled Roar, was finished in 1981, but it never got a wide release in the United States. Next week, it’s getting the VOD treatment.

Entertainment Weekly reports that Alamo Drafthouse is releasing the film—along with a video Q&A with John Marshall—on Vimeo starting Wednesday, April 15, at 7 p.m. EST. For $10, you’ll be able to stream it for one week on iOS, Android, Apple TV, Roku, and/or Chromecast. Ten percent of the profits will benefit the Will Rogers Motion Picture Pioneers Foundation’s Pioneers Assistance Fund, which will use the money to support theater workers unemployed during the coronavirus pandemic.

If you’re hoping Roar will live up to the jaw-dropping nature of Tiger King and similar programs, you won’t be disappointed. The narrative might be fictional, but the risky encounters with the various beasts are very real.

“I am amazed no one died,” John Marshall told Entertainment Weekly. A staggering 70 members of the cast and crew sustained serious injuries on set, including Hedren, who contracted gangrene after her leg was crushed by Timbo; Griffith, who required plastic surgery after a cat clawed her face; and John Marshall, whose head was gnawed on by a lion.

While you wait to watch Roar on Wednesday night, here are 10 wild animal documentaries you can stream right now.

[h/t Entertainment Weekly]

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