Queen Elizabeth II Approves of Buckingham Palace's New Official Gin

NASA/Bill Ingalls, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain
NASA/Bill Ingalls, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Queen Elizabeth II knows her gin. Every day before lunch, Her Majesty enjoys a glass of gin and Dubonnet on the rocks with a slice of lemon. Now, you can mix an authentic version of the regal cocktail at home. As Food & Wine reports, the Royal Collection Trust Shop now sells Buckingham Palace Gin.

Buying a bottle of the small-batch booze is the closest most of us can get to spending happy hour with the Queen. Many of the ingredients used to make the gin are sourced from the Buckingham Palace gardens. Lemon, verbena, hawthorn berries, and mulberry leaves are some of the 12 botanicals that give the spirit its floral, citrusy flavor.

Royal Trust Collection

Though it's sure to be an instant collector's item, this gin isn't just for royal wannabes. It will also be served at official events at Buckingham Palace. Though whether it's good enough for the Queen to drink with her Dubonnet, the palace hasn't said.

The Buckingham Palace Gin is now available for preorder at the Royal Collection Trust Shop for $50 (or £40). It's only available for shipping within the UK, and orders placed now won't be shipped until September 30. Gin isn't the only booze Queen Elizabeth enjoys on a daily basis. She also drinks a glass of wine with lunch, and wine made from her royal vineyard is also available to purchase.

[h/t Food & Wine]

Looking to Downsize? You Can Buy a 5-Room DIY Cabin on Amazon for Less Than $33,000

Five rooms of one's own.
Five rooms of one's own.
Allwood/Amazon

If you’ve already mastered DIY houses for birds and dogs, maybe it’s time you built one for yourself.

As Simplemost reports, there are a number of house kits that you can order on Amazon, and the Allwood Avalon Cabin Kit is one of the quaintest—and, at $32,990, most affordable—options. The 540-square-foot structure has enough space for a kitchen, a bathroom, a bedroom, and a sitting room—and there’s an additional 218-square-foot loft with the potential to be the coziest reading nook of all time.

You can opt for three larger rooms if you're willing to skip the kitchen and bathroom.Allwood/Amazon

The construction process might not be a great idea for someone who’s never picked up a hammer, but you don’t need an architectural degree to tackle it. Step-by-step instructions and all materials are included, so it’s a little like a high-level IKEA project. According to the Amazon listing, it takes two adults about a week to complete. Since the Nordic wood walls are reinforced with steel rods, the house can withstand winds up to 120 mph, and you can pay an extra $1000 to upgrade from double-glass windows and doors to triple-glass for added fortification.

Sadly, the cool ceiling lamp is not included.Allwood/Amazon

Though everything you need for the shell of the house comes in the kit, you will need to purchase whatever goes inside it: toilet, shower, sink, stove, insulation, and all other furnishings. You can also customize the blueprint to fit your own plans for the space; maybe, for example, you’re going to use the house as a small event venue, and you’d rather have two or three large, airy rooms and no kitchen or bedroom.

Intrigued? Find out more here.

[h/t Simplemost]

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The Reason Princess Anne Doesn’t Shake Hands With the Public

Princess Anne's aversion to handshakes isn't personal—it's logical.
Princess Anne's aversion to handshakes isn't personal—it's logical.
Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images

While many people have temporarily abandoned handshakes to prevent the spread of COVID-19, there’s at least one person who hasn’t really had to break the habit: Queen Elizabeth II’s daughter, Princess Anne.

As Reader’s Digest reports, royal family members have long been discouraged from shaking hands with the public simply because it wouldn’t be realistic to bestow a handshake upon every person clamoring for one in a crowd. But the Queen herself began to break with that tradition in the 1970s, and some of her relatives have followed suit—not Princess Anne, though.

“We never shook hands. The theory was that you couldn’t shake hands with everybody, so don’t start. So I kind of stick with that, but I noticed others don’t,” Princess Anne explained in the HBO documentary Queen of the World. “It's not for me to say that it's wrong, but I think the initial concept was that it was patently absurd to start shaking hands. And it seems to be that it's become a ‘shaking hands’ exercise rather than a walkabout, if you see what I mean.”

Even if you happen to meet the Queen or another British royal who’s been known to indulge in a ‘shaking hands’ exercise in the past, it’s still considered bad manners for you to initiate it.

“If you are a member of the public meeting a member of the royal family, you should never offer your hand to shake,” Grant Harrold, etiquette expert and former royal butler, told Insider. “Wait for them to initiate the handshake.”

Your chances are better if said royal happens to be wearing gloves, which they often don before public engagements where they plan to shake a lot of hands. The practice, perhaps unsurprisingly, helps shield them from germs.

[h/t Reader’s Digest]