How Charlie Chaplin Influenced the Most Disturbing Episode of The X-Files

FOX/Liaison
FOX/Liaison

In 1996, The X-Files released what would become one of its most notorious episodes. Inconspicuously titled “Home,” the episode follows paranormal detectives Dana Scully and Fox Mulder as they investigate the murder of an unidentified baby on the outskirts of a small Pennsylvania town. Their search quickly leads them to the Peacocks, a family of three deformed brothers, who appear to live alone on a farm, cut off from the rest of the world. Eventually, Mulder and Scully discover the brothers’ horrifying secret: their quadruple amputee mother, previously presumed dead, and responsible for giving birth to the murdered child.

Today, the episode is remembered as one of the most disturbing X-Files episodes of all time (Fox promised to never air it again after complaints of it being "tasteless")—though it's also a fan favorite. But what many viewers on either side of the argument might not know is that it was partially inspired by a truly surprising source: Charlie Chaplin's autobiography. 

Chaplin, who grew up poor in London, got his first big break playing a small part in a British theatrical production of Sherlock Holmes. The teenaged Chaplin toured the countryside with the theater troupe, and would seek out the cheapest lodging during his stay in each town. In My Autobiography, Chaplin describes a particularly strange stay at a miner’s house in a “dank, ugly” town called Ebbw Vale.

One night, after dinner, Chaplin’s host led him into the kitchen, announcing he had something to show the young actor. From a kitchen cupboard—where he was evidently sleeping—out crawled a man with no legs who, at the miner’s goading, began performing a series of strange tricks and dances. In the book, Chaplin recalls:

A half man with no legs, an oversized, blond, flat-shaped head, a sickening white face, a sunken nose, a large mouth and powerful muscular shoulders and arms, crawled from underneath the dresser … "Hey, Gilbert, jump!" said the father and the wretched man lowered himself slowly, then shot up by his arms almost to the height of my head. 

"How do you think he’d fit in with a circus? The human frog!"

I was so horrified I could hardly answer. However, I suggested the names of several circuses that he might write to.

The incident shocked Chaplin—and its retelling apparently had a strong impact on The X-Files writer Glen Morgan as well. According to Morgan, who co-wrote the episode with James Wong, Chaplin's story came back to him while he was writing "Home." Though Morgan mis-remembered the anecdote slightly—he recalled the man being totally limbless, and that the family members "[stood] him up and start[ed] singing and dancing, and the kid kind of flop[ped] around"—the general image stuck with him for a long time. “I think I read that like 13 years ago, and ever since then I thought, 'God, I gotta do something like that!,’” Morgan later explained [PDF]. So he modeled the mother of the Peacock brothers on the legless man under the dresser. Hidden under a bed for most of the episode, Mama Peacock served as the final twist in one of The X-Files' most controversial episodes.

You can see co-writer Wong discussing the episode—and Chaplin's influence on it—in the video below.

Kodak’s New Cameras Don't Just Take Photos—They Also Print Them

Your Instagram account wishes it had this clout.
Your Instagram account wishes it had this clout.
Kodak

Snapping a photo and immediately sharing it on social media is definitely convenient, but there’s still something so satisfying about having the printed photo—like you’re actually holding the memory in your hands. Kodak’s new STEP cameras now offer the best of both worlds.

As its name implies, the Kodak STEP Instant Print Digital Camera, available for $70 on Amazon, lets you take a picture and print it out on that very same device. Not only do you get to skip the irksome process of uploading photos to your computer and printing them on your bulky, non-portable printer (or worse yet, having to wait for your local pharmacy to print them for you), but you never need to bother with ink cartridges or toner, either. The Kodak STEP comes with special 2-inch-by-3-inch printing paper inlaid with color crystals that bring your image to life. There’s also an adhesive layer on the back, so you can easily stick your photos to laptop covers, scrapbooks, or whatever else could use a little adornment.

There's a 10-second self-timer, so you don't have to ask strangers to take your group photos.Kodak

For those of you who want to give your photos some added flair, you might like the Kodak STEP Touch, available for $130 from Amazon. It’s similar to the regular Kodak STEP, but the LCD touch screen allows you to edit your photos before you print them; you can also shoot short videos and even share your content straight to social media.

If you want to print photos from your smartphone gallery, there's the Kodak STEP Instant Mobile Photo Printer. This portable $80 printer connects to any iOS or Android device with Bluetooth capabilities and can print whatever photos you send to it.

The Kodak STEP Instant Mobile Photo Printer connects to an app that allows you to add filters and other effects to your photos. Kodak

All three Kodak STEP devices come with some of that magical printer paper, but you can order additional refills, too—a 20-sheet set costs $8 on Amazon.

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Cheesy Like Sunday Morning: Kraft Declares Mac and Cheese a Breakfast Food

Your morning routine just got cheesier.
Your morning routine just got cheesier.
Business Wire

If you take a moment to think about so-called “breakfast foods,” you’ll realize that most of them are just slightly different iterations of foods that aren’t limited to morning meals. Muffins are basically cupcakes with less frosting, and Canadian-style bacon looks a lot like pork loin (it is). Once you’ve broken down these breakfast barriers in your mind, you’re just one small step away from eating macaroni and cheese at 7 a.m.—which, according to Kraft, is totally acceptable.

As CNN reports, Kraft is releasing boxes of its classic mac and cheese with the word breakfast written where it usually says dinner. It’s a way to make parents feel better about deviating from societal expectations as they try to keep their cantankerous kids fed and happy during the current pandemic.

“As a brand loved by the entire family, we’ve learned Kraft Mac & Cheese isn’t just for dinner,” Kraft Heinz spokesperson Kelsey Cooperstein said in a press release. “A Kraft Mac & Cheese breakfast is a win-win for families at a time when they need all the wins they can get.”

Apparently, quite a few people have already mentally removed dinner from the box: in a survey of 1000 parents, Kraft found that 56 percent of them had whipped up morning mac and cheese more often during lockdown. And if they felt a little guilty for not breaking out the waffle iron, Kraft is hoping to make sure they don’t anymore.

Macaroni and cheese lovers can try to snag a breakfast box by tweeting with the hashtags #KMCforBreakfast and #Sweepstakes, and you’ll see a reply to your tweet with a link that’ll reveal if you’ve won. The campaign is running through Friday, August 7, and Kraft will donate 10 boxes of mac and cheese to the nonprofit organization Feed the Children for every entry (winner or not).

Even if you don’t win a designated breakfast box, there’s no reason you can’t appropriate a dinner one for daybreak. In fact, why limit yourself to classic Kraft? Cheetos-flavored mac and cheese is coming to shelves, too.

[h/t CNN]