15 People Who Have Won at Least 15 Grammys

ROBYN BECK, AFP, Getty Images
ROBYN BECK, AFP, Getty Images

Winning armfuls of Grammys in one sweeping year makes for a great pressroom photo, such as when Norah Jones won five in 2003 or when Adele won six in 2012, but racking up wins year after year takes a career full of quality work. Joining the ranks of those artists who have won at least 15 Grammys takes time, as these musicians prove.

1. GEORG SOLTI

Getty Images

With 31 wins, Georg Solti is the reigning king of the Grammys. An orchestral and operatic conductor, he led such world-renowned orchestras as the Bavarian State Opera and London’s Royal Opera, and he served as the music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra for 22 years. He snagged 30 Grammys for classical recordings between 1962 and 1992, as well as a lifetime achievement Grammy the year before his death. “Sir Georg [he was knighted in 1972] was the very model of a modern conductor,” The New York Times wrote. “He knew that recordings were essential, and in the studio he was efficient enough to turn out hundreds of them and artful enough to keep a grip on listeners' attention, even in the most frequently recorded repertory.” Solti died in 1997, and his Grammy record still stands.

2. QUINCY JONES

Juggling six Grammys in 1991Getty Images

The legendary producer holds the record for the most Grammy nominations with 79, but with 27 trophies to his name, he's tied for second for most won. His first statue came in 1964 for his instrumental arrangement of Count Basie’s 1963 song “I Can’t Stop Loving You.” He took home a few more instrumental arrangement Grammys in the ‘70s, and then he met Michael Jackson. Their work on Thriller and “We Are the World” garnered him six more wins, and though he is likely best known for producing Jackson’s first three albums, the large majority of Jones’s honors are for his work with classical and jazz music.

3. ALISON KRAUSS

The bluegrass singer-songwriter has been winning Grammys since 1991, when she was just 19 years old. That night, Quincy Jones swept up six awards, but Krauss would soon catch up with his total—the two of them are tied at 27 for the second-most Grammy wins ever—and Krauss could pull ahead in 2018, as she has two nominations. Krauss continued winning bluegrass and country trophies, and became more widely known for her Grammy-winning work on the O Brother Where Art Thou? soundtrack. But her most surprising collaboration was with Led Zeppelin frontman Robert Plant: Their platinum 2008 duet album, Raising Sand, won six Grammys, including Record of the Year and Album of the Year.

4. STEVIE WONDER

Little Stevie Wonder had been a child prodigy who cranked out hit after hit after getting a label deal at age 11, so when he finally won four Grammys for his 16th album, 1973's Innervisions, and the singles "You Are the Sunshine of My Life" and "Superstition," it felt long overdue. At that time, Wonder was the second youngest artist ever to win Album of the Year at 23 years old. Wonder has taken home a total of 25 Grammys.

5. JOHN WILLIAMS

Composer John Williams is one of the most decorated and celebrated film-score composers of all time, and in addition to winning five Oscars, he also has 23 Grammys. His first came in 1976 for Best Score Soundtrack for Jaws, and like the movie's main theme, many of Williams's subsequent scores could be readily identified by just their opening notes. Williams won five Grammys for the Star Wars franchise, but even with his high trophy count, many of his most recognizable scores, such as for Jurassic Park, Hook, and Harry Potter, were only nominated.

6. BEYONCÉ

Between her girl-group days in Destiny's Child and her impressive solo career, Beyoncé has racked up 22 Grammys since 2000. In 2010, she became the first female artist to win six trophies in one night (a record that Adele tied two years later). Four of her wins—two for her first solo single "Crazy in Love" and two at last year's awards for "Drunk in Love"—are likely of special significance to the star—they showcased one particularly fruitful collaborator: husband Jay-Z. While she currently has more Grammy Awards than her husband, that could change in 2018.

7. AND 8. JAY-Z AND KANYE WEST

The rappers and frequent collaborators each have 21 Grammys, with six of those being joint wins for songs like “Otis,” “N****s in Paris,” and “No Church in the Wild.” Jay-Z has a chance to pull ahead this year, though; he leads the 2018 pack of nominees with a total of eight nominations.

9. PAUL MCCARTNEY

Sir Paul has won 18 Grammys, starting with the Beatles' Best New Artist win in 1965 and spanning his time in that band, Wings, and his solo career. But for the first time this year, Macca is nominated in two rap categories—Best Rap Performance and Best Rap Song—for his work on Kanye West's "All Day."

10. ARETHA FRANKLIN

The Queen of Soul's eight-year winning streak for the category Best Female R&B Vocal Performance, starting with "Respect" (1967) and ending with "Ain't Nothing Like the Real Thing" (1974), holds the record for most consecutive wins in a category. She won three more of those in the '80s, plus seven others for categories like gospel performances, for a grand total of 18 Grammys.

11. ERIC CLAPTON

Eric Clapton won six Grammys in 1993.Getty Images

Eric Clapton is considered one of the greatest guitarists of all time, but he hadn't won an individual Grammy until the 1990s, long after his '60s and '70s heyday. His biggest take was in 1993 for his Unplugged album and tribute song "Tears in Heaven," which was written for his 4-year-old son who had died just two years earlier. He now has 17 total Grammys.

12. VINCE GILL

Surprisingly, Vince Gill is the only country artist to have more than 15 Grammys. (Even Willie Nelson and Dolly Parton only have eight apiece.) Starting in 1990, Gill has picked up nine Best Male Country Vocal Performance and a slew of Best Country Instrumental Performance trophies for a grand total of 21 Grammys.

13. JIMMY STURR

Trumpeter, clarinetist, and saxophonist Jimmy Sturr is a good example of someone dominating a lesser-known category. The category no longer exists, but when it did, Sturr and his band won 18 out of 25 Best Polka Album Grammys between 1986 and 2009.

14. RAY CHARLES

Ray Charles won 12 Grammys during his lifetime, but in 2005, he became the artist to win the most posthumous awards in one night. His album Genius Loves Company was released two months after his death in 2004, and won the late singer five Grammys, including Record and Album of the Year, bringing his total trophy count to 17.

15. ALICIA KEYS

In 2001, Keys won the first five of her current 15 Grammys in one huge night—her debut album Songs in A Minor took home Best R&B Album, while the hit single “Fallin’” won three categories. Keys also won Best New Artist that year, which made her (at the time) only the second solo female artist (after Lauryn Hill) to win five Grammys in one night.

10 Rad Gifts for Hikers

Greg Rosenke/Unsplash
Greg Rosenke/Unsplash

The popularity of bird-watching, camping, and hiking has skyrocketed this year. Whether your gift recipients are weekend warriors or seasoned dirtbags, they'll appreciate these tools and gear for getting most out of their hiking experience.

1. Stanley Nesting Two-Cup Cookset; $14

Amazon

Stanley’s compact and lightweight cookset includes a 20-ounce stainless steel pot with a locking handle, a vented lid, and two insulated 10-ounce tumblers. It’s the perfect size for brewing hot coffee, rehydrating soup, or boiling water while out on the trail with a buddy. And as some hardcore backpackers note in their Amazon reviews, your favorite hiker can take the tumblers out and stuff the pot with a camp stove, matches, and other necessities to make good use of space in their pack.

Buy it: Amazon

2. Osprey Sirrus and Stratos 24-Liter Hiking Packs; $140

Amazon

Osprey’s packs are designed with trail-tested details to maximize comfort and ease of use. The Sirrus pack (pictured) is sized for women, while the Stratos fits men’s proportions. Both include an internal sleeve for a hydration reservoir, exterior mesh and hipbelt pockets, an attachment for carrying trekking poles, and a built-in rain cover.

Buy them: Amazon, Amazon

3. Yeti Rambler 18-Ounce Bottle; $48

Amazon

Nothing beats ice-cold water after a summer hike or a sip of hot tea during a winter walk. The Yeti Rambler can serve up both: Beverages can stay hot or cold for hours thanks to its insulated construction, and its steel body (in a variety of colors) is basically indestructible. It will add weight to your hiker's pack, though—for a lighter-weight, non-insulated option, the tried-and-true Camelbak Chute water bottle is incredibly sturdy and leakproof.

Buy it: Amazon

4. Mappinners Greatest 100 Hikes of the National Parks Scratch-Off Poster; $30

Amazon

The perfect gift for park baggers in your life (or yourself), this 16-inch-by-20-inch poster features epic hikes like Angel’s Landing in Zion National Park and Half Dome in Yosemite National Park. Once the hike is complete, you can scratch off the gold foil to reveal an illustration of the park.

Buy it: Amazon

5. National Geographic Adventure Edition Road Atlas; $19

Amazon

Hikers can use this brand-new, updated road atlas to plan their next adventure. In addition to comprehensive maps of all 50 states, Puerto Rico, Canada, and Mexico, they'll get National Geographic’s top 100 outdoor destinations, useful details about the most popular national parks, and points on the maps noting off-the-beaten-path places to explore.  

Buy it: Amazon

6. Adventure Medical Kits Hiker First-Aid Kit; $25

Amazon

This handy 67-piece kit is stuffed with all the things you hope your hiker will never need in the wilderness. Not only does it contain supplies for pain, cuts and scrapes, burns, and blisters (every hiker’s nemesis!), the items are organized clearly in the bag to make it easy to find tweezers or an alcohol wipe in an emergency.

Buy it: Amazon

7. Hiker Hunger Ultralight Trekking Poles; $70

Amazon

Trekking poles will help increase your hiker's balance and stability and reduce strain on their lower body by distributing it to their arms and shoulders. This pair is made of carbon fiber, a super-strong and lightweight material. From the sweat-absorbing cork handles to the selection of pole tips for different terrain, these poles answer every need on the trail. 

Buy it: Amazon

8. Leatherman Signal Camping Multitool; $120

Amazon

What can’t this multitool do? This gadget contains 19 hiking-friendly tools in a 4.5-inch package, including pliers, screwdrivers, bottle opener, saw, knife, hammer, wire cutter, and even an emergency whistle.

Buy it: Amazon

9. RAVPower Power Bank; $24

Amazon

Don’t let your hiker get caught off the grid with a dead phone. They can charge RAVPower’s compact power bank before they head out on the trail, and then use it to quickly juice up a phone or tablet when the batteries get low. Its 3-inch-by-5-inch profile won’t take up much room in a pack or purse.

Buy it: Amazon

10. Pack of Four Indestructible Field Books; $14

Amazon

Neither rain, nor snow, nor hail will be a match for these waterproof, tearproof 3.5-inch-by-5.5-inch notebooks. Your hiker can stick one in their pocket along with a regular pen or pencil to record details of their hike or brainstorm their next viral Tweet.

Buy it: Amazon

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A New Documentary Investigates West Virginia’s Infamous Mothman

The Mothman statue in Point Pleasant, West Virginia.
The Mothman statue in Point Pleasant, West Virginia.
Jimmy Emerson DVM, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

The continuing impact of the Mothman on Point Pleasant, West Virginia, is hard to overlook. The town plays host to a statue, a museum, and an annual festival that all celebrate the red-eyed flying beast who first showed up on the scene in 1966.

In November of that year, two couples spotted a winged, vaguely man-shaped monster near the so-called “TNT area,” a collection of abandoned bunkers where explosives were stored during World War II. After the Point Pleasant Register reported on their harrowing ordeal, other sightings started rolling in. When nearly four dozen people were killed in a bridge collapse on December 15, 1967, many believed the Mothman was somehow involved.

The infamous cryptid’s popularity endured over the ensuing decades with the help of John Keel’s 1975 book The Mothman Prophecies and the 2002 movie adaptation starring Richard Gere and Laura Linney. While glimpses of the Mothman himself definitely peaked during the ’60s, close encounters with a strange creature in West Virginia still surface to this day.

In his new documentary The Mothman Legacy, director Seth Breedlove delves into the history of the Mothman, investigating its long legacy in Pleasant Point and interviewing more recent eyewitnesses. It’s not Breedlove’s first film on the matter; he also directed 2017’s The Mothman of Point Pleasant, which focuses on the Mothman’s heyday from November 1966 to the bridge catastrophe a year later.

His latest project features Jeff Wamsley, who has written two books on the subject and also founded the town’s Mothman Museum. As The Daily Beast reports, The Mothman Legacy doesn’t exactly try to solve the mystery of the Mothman or debunk all the theories about it. Instead, it’s more of a celebration of the urban legend, complete with spooky CGI reenactments and plenty of eerie accounts of alleged run-ins with the monster. In short, it’s ideal fodder for your Halloween movie marathon—and as narrator Lyle Blackburn points out in the film, “an absence of evidence doesn’t necessarily indicate an evidence of absence.”

The documentary is now available to buy on VOD through Amazon Prime, YouTube, and other streaming platforms.

[h/t The Daily Beast]