15 Fun Facts About Knocked Up

Universal Studios
Universal Studios

Ten years ago, Knocked Up solidified Seth Rogen as an unconventional Hollywood leading man and helped writer/director Judd Apatow become one of the most recognizable names in comedy. The film stars Rogen as Ben Stone, an immature but well-meaning schlub who accidentally impregnates accomplished entertainment journalist Alison Scott (Katherine Heigl). The movie grossed over $215 million worldwide on a $30 million budget, and it also spawned the spin-off This is 40 (2012), focusing on Alison's sister (Leslie Mann) and her husband (Paul Rudd). Here are 15 facts about Knocked Up, which premiered in theaters 10 years ago.

1. ANNE HATHAWAY WAS ORIGINALLY CAST AS ALISON.

Though the Knocked Up cast received plenty of praise from critics, it was originally going to look much different, as Anne Hathaway had initially agreed to play the lead role of Alison.

“Hathaway dropped out of the film because she didn’t want to allow us to use real footage of a woman giving birth to create the illusion that she is giving birth,” Judd Apatow wrote to The New York Times. According to Apatow's wife, Leslie Mann, he was also thinking of Alison Lohman for the role, but it "didn't work out."

Mila Kunis auditioned for the role, too. While Apatow passed on her for Alison, she did get a consolation prize: She landed the role of Rachel Jansen in 2008's Forgetting Sarah Marshall, which Apatow produced and Jason Segel wrote.

2. SETH ROGEN AND HIS MOVIE ROOMMATES IMPROVISED FOR APATOW.

Rogen's character's roommates were Jason Segel, Jay Baruchel, Martin Starr, and Jonah Hill, who all went by their real first names. Apatow had them all come over to his house to record them improvising scenes to help them all find their fictionalized versions of themselves. During one of the rehearsal days, Apatow asked how the group could be more interesting, which is when Rogen's writing partner, Seth Goldberg, brought up the "Dirty Man Competition."

"We'd have a bet with a guy to see how long he could go without shaving or showering or cutting his hair," Goldberg told Apatow. Added Segel, "We thought we could chart the nine months based on Martin's beard length." An abandoned addition to the bit would have had Baruchel trying to maintain a Vanilla Ice-like hairstyle longer than Starr had his beard.

3. THE MORE MEMORABLE CONVERSATIONS WERE IMPROVISED.

At the first Knocked Up table read, Rogen told Baruchel about Munich, a movie he had just seen. The resulting conversation was a part of the first scene that was shot. Rogen was also responsible for Ben and Pete's fascination with the surplus of chairs in their Las Vegas hotel room, according to Paul Rudd.

"We were getting ready to shoot the scene and Seth was like, 'There are a lot of chairs!' because the set designer kind of brought in a lot of spare prop chairs," Rudd recalled. "And I was like, how do I show somebody's on mushrooms? Let's talk about chairs for a while!"

4. THE CONDITIONS WERE SURPRISINGLY BRUTAL.

During a week of shooting in Northridge, California, conditions were particularly brutal, with temperatures surpassing 115°F. Despite Baruchel reminding everyone to drink water, Segel didn't listen and ended up falling ill. After Segel and Rogen shot their fight scene, they both needed oxygen.

5. JAY BARUCHEL HAD A REAL FEAR OF ROLLER COASTERS.

The roller coaster sequence was used in the final cut's opening credits. It was shot on location at Knott's Berry Farm, but not every member of the cast was fond of the experience.

"There’s a very funny documentary about the roller coaster sequence because Jay Baruchel didn’t want to do it because he says he gets panic attacks on roller coasters," Apatow explained. "The documentary is about me manipulating him into doing it and you see me basically lying to him saying, 'It’s not that bad' and then him having a panic attack on the roller coaster. And then he won’t do it again and we have to keep doing it all day and then you see—because most people want to see this—most of our actors vomiting over and over."

6. JOEY BUTTAFUOCO SHOWED UP UNANNOUNCED ON SET.

Joey Buttafuoco, the Long Island auto body shop owner who became infamous thanks to his affair with Amy Fisher, was working a craft services truck on set one afternoon. His surprise cameo briefly lifted the spirits of the sweltering cast and crew in Northridge.

7. IT WAS KEN JEONG'S FILM DEBUT.

Ken Jeong had appeared on some TV shows like The Office and Entourage, but the doctor/stand-up comedian made his feature film debut in Knocked Up as Dr. Kuni. He shot it during a "vacation week." Jeong told NPR playing Dr. Kuni was his "first big break," and that Apatow was looking for an Asian actor with medical experience.

8. BILL HADER WORKED AS A VIDEO EDITOR FOR E! BEFORE HE PLAYED A VIDEO EDITOR FOR E! IN THE MOVIE.

For Bill Hader, the movie served as a trip back to his earlier days on the E! network.

"So I was down the hall (from) where I used to work, and that was weird seeing some of the guys I used to work with,” Hader remembered. “They were like, ‘Oh, you’re Mr. Hollywood now.’"

9. RYAN SEACREST GOT INTO THE MOVIE AFTER APATOW SAW HIM GET ANNOYED AT A TARDY CELEBRITY.

Apatow and his crew visited the E! News set for research. They found an annoyed Seacrest repeatedly trying to leave, annoyed that a guest was running late. Apatow found this so funny that he decided to put it into the movie, with the late celebrity being Jessica Simpson. Not used to reading a script, Apatow instructed, “Hey, can you use a bad word and make fun of a couple people and, at the end of this whole scene, really make sure you make fun of yourself?”

10. APATOW HAD TO CONVINCE LESLIE MANN TO HIRE THEIR DAUGHTERS.


Universal Pictures

Leslie Mann was initially reluctant to let their daughters, Maude and Iris, appear in the movie. "Time passed by, and I was saying no, no. no, and then I’m like—I dunno, maybe," Mann said. "And then it was like a week before and he said, 'You have to tell me now.' He would ask me when I was really busy, so I couldn’t really focus on it and then it ended up just happening. But it’s okay…"

The two girls were later featured in a much larger role in the spin-off, This is 40.

11. APATOW HAD A CONNECTION TO CIRQUE DU SOLEIL HE DIDN'T KNOW ABOUT.

Apatow had tried to incorporate Cirque du Soleil in his earlier movies, but it never survived the rewrites until Knocked Up. After having an easy shoot, the writer/director discovered that the head of PR at Cirque was Apatow's babysitter when he was a kid.

12. THEY USED THREE DIFFERENT PREGNANCY BELLY MOLDS FOR HEIGL.

A plaster cast was made of the front side of Heigl's torso and then sculpted into a three-month belly, a belly for six months, and finally one for nine months. They were filled with poly foam. Freckles and veins were also painted on to make it look real. Attaching and finishing the prosthetic took 45 minutes each day for the scenes when the belly was shown on screen.

It was easier to make the disgusting pool. The sides of the pool were painted green and it was filled with clean water, mixed with gallons of instant tea for density.

13. APATOW REALLY WANTED TO SHOW THE CROWNING SHOT.


Universal Studios

Apatow explained his rationale to Collider: "So the reason that I show the crowning shot is if I don’t show it I just look like an episode of Friends, and I am trying to make you feel the pain of that experience, because it is the most intense moment in people’s lives and I had to do something that hadn’t been done before."

His intent was to find a woman who would agree to let him film a real baby being born, but in California, "the unborn child would need a worker’s permit and I can’t get it 'til he’s born. There is a Kurt Vonnegut problem right there. So, we weren’t able to do it, so it became a prosthetic."

14. BRIDESMAIDS GOT ITS START FROM KRISTEN WIIG'S APPEARANCE IN THE MOVIE.

Kristen Wiig played Jill, one of Heigl's bosses at E!. It was there that she met Apatow, who later asked her to write a movie for her to star in that he would produce. When Wiig and Annie Mumolo pitched him Bridesmaids, Apatow thought it was great.

15. KATHERINE HEIGL THOUGHT THE MOVIE WAS "A LITTLE SEXIST."

In 2008, Heigl told Vanity Fair she thought the movie was "a little sexist," and felt it "paints the women as shrews, as humorless and uptight, and it paints the men as lovable, goofy, fun-loving guys."

She later retracted her comments somewhat, saying she just didn't like how her character, Alison, came across. “I just didn’t like me," Heigl told Howard Stern. "She was kind of like, she was so judgmental and kind of uptight and controlling and all these things and I really went with it while we were doing it, and a lot of it, Judd allows everyone to be very free and improvise and whatever and afterwards, I was like, ‘Why is that where I went with this? What an a**hole she is!’ Judd and Seth were incredibly good to me on this movie, so I did not mean to sh*t on them at all."

Rewind Time With This Blockbuster-Themed Party Game

Amazon/Big Potato Games
Amazon/Big Potato Games

With only one Blockbuster location left in the world, the good old days of wandering video rental store aisles and getting chewed out for late fees are definitely a thing of the past—but like so many relics from the '90s, the pull of nostalgia has ensured that Blockbuster (or at least the brand) won't disappear for good. Now the video store is back in the form of a party game from Big Potato Games that is designed to test the movie knowledge of you and up to 11 friends.

Marketing itself as “a movie game for anyone who has ever seen a movie,” the Blockbuster party game consists of two parts. In part one, players from each team compete head-to-head to name as many movies as they can that fit under specific categories (e.g., movies with Tom Cruise, famous trilogies, movies with planes). In the second half, two teams face off against each other to test their skills at a game of movie-related charades. The catch? Players can only describe movies in one of three randomly chosen ways: acting out scenes, rattling off a famous quote, or describing the films with one word.

The real selling point of the whole package is that Big Potato fit all the game cards and buzzer into a box that is virtually identical to the old-school Blockbuster VHS rental cases, right down to its distinct color scheme and shape. All it's missing is the membership card. 

The Blockbuster board game costs $26 on Amazon and $20 at Target. That’s a fair price for getting the chance to rewind time.

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8 Festive Facts About Hallmark Channel Christmas Movies

The holiday season means gifts, lavish meals, stocking stuffers, and what appear to be literally hundreds of holiday-themed movies running in perpetuity on the Hallmark Channel, which has come to replace footage of a crackling fireplace as the background noise of choice for cozy evenings indoors. Last year, roughly 70 million people watched Hallmark's holiday scheduling block. If you’re curious how the network manages to assemble films like Check Inn to Christmas, Christmas at Graceland: Home for the Holidays, and Sense, Sensibility & Snowmen with such efficiency—a total of 40 new films will debut this season on the Hallmark Channel, Hallmark Movies and Mysteries, and Hallmark Movies Now—keep reading.

1. The Hallmark Channel Christmas movie tradition started with ABC.

The idea of unspooling a continuous run of holiday films started in the 1990s, when ABC offshoot network ABC Family started a "25 Days of Christmas" programming promotion that would go on to feature the likes of Joey Lawrence and Mario Lopez. The Hallmark Channel, which launched in 2001, didn’t fully embrace the concept until 2011, when ABC Family moved away from the concept in an effort to appeal to teen viewers.

2. Most Hallmark Channel Christmas movies are shot in Canada.

To maximize their $2 million budget, most Hallmark Channel holiday features are shot in Canada, where tax breaks can stretch the dollar. Wintry Vancouver is a popular destination, though films have also been shot in Montreal and Toronto. One film, 2018's Christmas at the Palace, was shot in Romania to take advantage of the country's castles.

3. Each Hallmark Channel Christmas movie only takes a couple of weeks to film.

If you’re wondering why a holiday movie on basic cable can regularly attract—and keep—a list of talent ranging from Candace Cameron Bure to Lacey Chabert, the answer is partly scheduling. Most Hallmark holiday movies take just two to three weeks to shoot, meaning actors don’t have to commit months out of the year to a project. Actors like Rachael Leigh Cook, who stars in this year's A Blue Ridge Mountain Christmas, have also complimented the channel on giving them opportunities to be with their families while on location: Cook said that the production schedule allowed her time to FaceTime with family back home.

4. Hallmark Channel Christmas movies use a variety of tricks to create snow.

Even more pervasive than Dean Cain in the Hallmark Channel Christmas line-up is snow. Because some of the films shoot in the summer, it’s not always possible to achieve that powder naturally. Producers use a variety of tricks to simulate snowfall, including snow blankets that mimic the real thing when laid out; foam; commercial replica snow; crushed limestone; and ice shavings. Actors might also get covered with soapy bubbles for close-ups. The typical budget for snow per movie is around $50,000.

5. There’s a psychological reason why Hallmark Channel Christmas movies are so addictive.

Like a drug, Hallmark Channel Christmas movies provide a neurological reward. Speaking with CNBC in 2019, Pamela Rutledge, behavioral scientist, director of the Media Psychology Research Center, and a faculty member in the Media Psychology department at Fielding Graduate University, explained that the formulaic plots and predictability of the films is rewarding, especially when viewers are trying to unwind from the stress of the holiday season. “The lack of reality at all levels, from plot to production, signals that the movies are meant to be escapism entertainment,” Rutledge said. “The genre is well-defined, and our expectations follow. This enables us to suspend disbelief.”

6. Hallmark Channel Christmas movie fans now have their own convention.

Call it the Comic-Con of holiday cheer. This year, fans of Hallmark Channel’s Christmas programming got to attend ChristmasCon, a celebration of all things Hallmark in Edison, New Jersey. Throngs of people gathered to attend panels with movie actors and writers, scoop up merchandise, and vie for prizes during an ugly sweater competition. The first wave of $50 admission tickets sold out instantly. Hallmark Channel USA was the official sponsor.

7. Hallmark Channel Christmas movies are helping keep cable afloat.

Actors Brooke D'Orsay and Marc Blucas are pictured in a publicity still from the 2017 Hallmark Channel original movie 'Miss Christmas'
Brooke D'Orsay and Marc Blucas in Miss Christmas (2017).
Hallmark Channel

In an era of cord-cutting and streaming apps, more and more people are turning away from cable television, preferring to queue up programming when they want it. But viewers of Hallmark Channel’s holiday offerings often tune in as the movie is airing. In 2016, 4 million viewers watched the line-up “live.” One reason might be the communal nature of the films. People tend to watch holiday-oriented programming in groups, tuning in as they air. The result? For the fourth quarter of 2018, the Hallmark Channel was the most-watched cable network among women 18 to 49 and 25 to 54, even outpacing broadcast network programming on Saturday nights.

8. You can get paid to watch Hallmark Channel Christmas movies.

If you think you have the constitution to make it through 24 Hallmark Channel holiday films in 12 days, you might want to consider applying for the Hallmark Movie Dream Job contest, which is sponsored by Internet Service Partners and will pay $1000 to the winning entrant who seems most capable of binging the two dozen films and making wry comments about them on social media. You can enter though December 6 here.

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