15 Tupperware™ Facts From the Back of the Fridge

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Tupperware™ is a household name in food storage, but there’s a lot you may not know about this decades-old container company.

1. TUPPERWARE™ GETS ITS NAME FROM CREATOR EARL TUPPER.

The famed storage containers weren't named at random. Inventor Earl Tupper branded the plastic sets with his own name after years of working with plastic and decades of flopped inventions. Tupper was a prolific innovator who had begun his own business, Tupper Tree Doctors, to help him in his goal to become a millionaire at age 30, while also supporting his wife and five children. After business dried up with the Great Depression, Tupper landed a job at a plastics factory in Leominster, Massachusetts. The new gig inspired him to venture out on his own and mold the then-new material into beads and plastic cigarette containers. By the late 1940s, Tupper’s experiments produced the first Tupperware™ bowls—called Wonderbowls.

2. TUPPER CREATED A NAIL DESIGN KIT THAT WAS AHEAD OF ITS TIME.

Tupper didn’t just create food storage solutions. He was a serial inventor and his notebooks (which have been digitized and are stored at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History) feature dozens of ideas meant to solve everyday problems. Tupper thought up no-drip ice cream cones, more comfortable corsets, fishing poles that weighed your catch as it was reeled in, and even a fish-propelled boat. One of Tupper’s ideas prior to Tupperware™ was his nail design kit. Created in 1937, the kits included tiny, plastic embellishments that could be glued on for dazzling manicures. While friends and family enjoyed the kits, they never went to market.

3. TUPPER'S EARLY BOWLS WERE WORKS OF ART.

Tupper focused heavily the Wonderbowl’s design, working to create an elegant piece of dishware that stood out from other kitchen items sold in stores. Initially, the Wonderbowl snagged accolades and won several design contests. By 1956, Tupper’s plastic products were even on display at the New York Museum of Modern Art. For some time, Tupper even had a Fifth Avenue retail spot for his innovative food storage bowls.

4. THE STORAGE CONTAINERS WERE INITIALLY A FLOP.

While Tupper was a clever inventor, he wasn’t the best at marketing. In its early days, Tupperware™ struggled at its Fifth Avenue store and catalogue sales slumped. Even with a good idea, Tupper’s salesman skills weren’t strong. His previously invented "Sure-Stay" bobby pins offered superior grip to other hairpins, but Tupper’s awkward ad copy didn’t make the sale: "Many women wear more or less false hair. Wigs cost good money, and romance or social prestige often hangs by the hairs on one’s head. A good 'Sure-Stay' hairpin is needed." Early Tupperware™ suffered similar slumping sales as Tupper’s other oddly marketed products.

5. A MOM-TURNED-SALESWOMAN SAVED TUPPERWARE™.

Tupper believed he had created a useful piece of art for the modern housewife, but he knew his efforts weren’t helping the products sell. And if it weren’t for Brownie Wise, a divorced single mom with an eighth-grade education and expert sales skills, Tupperware™ wouldn’t have become a household name. Despite being a successful saleswoman for Stanley Home Products, Wise knew she had no future with the company after being told "management is no place for a woman." After encountering Tupperware™, Wise quit selling brooms in 1949 and picked up plastic storage containers. That same year, she sold $150,000 worth of Tupperware™ and became a distributor for the state of Florida. After several years of sales, Wise called up Tupper to express her dismay about the downsides of the company, namely incorrect orders and shipping delays. Within a month, the two met and Wise gave Tupper the secret to her success and Tupperware’s™ future: home party sales.

6. BROWNIE WISE JUMP-STARTED THE HOME PARTY SALES.

Soon after Tupper met with Wise, she was offered a leadership role unusual for a woman in the 1950s: Vice President of Tupperware™. Wise’s grand idea for Tupperware’s™ success wasn’t her own. Her former employer, Stanley Home Products, only sold its goods through home parties at a time when many sales companies still sold door-to-door. But, she used the sales tactic to Tupperware’s™ advantage, successfully transforming the company into a thriving home goods company and changing the way retailers of the time made sales. Within Wise’s first year as vice president, Tupperware™ orders surpassed $2 million, all because of the home party idea. At the heart of it, she knew it was the small people along the Tupperware™ chain that made the company successful: "Build the people and they’ll build the business."

7. EARLY TUPPERWARE™ SELLERS DIDN'T SELL—THEY DATED PARTIES.

Selling Tupperware™ was a viable side job for many stay-at-home mothers and housewives of the 1950s, '60s, and beyond. Hawking these plastic containers and tools required little specialty training and could be scaled up or down based on a woman’s schedule. But Tupperware™ made it clear that its saleswomen—called dealers or consultants—weren't scheduling sales pitches, they were "dating" parties (which even today Tupperware™ explains as "a.k.a. scheduling"). The goal was to create an atmosphere of fun complete with games, such as one where guests won Tupperware™ miniatures for writing the best sales ad for their husbands.

8. TOP TUPPERWARE™ SELLERS ROPED IN THEIR HUSBANDS.

While most Tupperware™ sellers were women, those who did exceptionally well got their husbands involved. Top Tupperware™ dealers quickly rose through the ranks and could be promoted from dealer to manager, which had perks such as additional commission, features in the company newsletter and prizes at the annual Tupperware™ Jubilee. But women who excelled at manager status could become a regional distributor, tasked with overseeing Tupperware™ sales and operations in their area. Because of social conventions of the time—and the difficulty for women to get their own business loans or have a bank account—married women were only awarded a distributor role if their husbands agreed to quit their day jobs and join their wives full-time.

9. WISE LOVED TO REWARD TUPPERWARE™ SELLERS WITH EXTRAVAGANT PRIZES.

As part of fostering Tupperware’s™ hardest workers, Wise launched the annual Tupperware™ Home Parties Jubilee, a gathering of top hostesses, managers, and distributors. With exotic themes such as "Around the World in 80 Days" and "Arabian Nights," Tupperware’s™ best won German clocks, fur stoles and coats, Chinese carvings, and entire wardrobes packed with clothing. At the first Jubilee in 1954, Wise ran with a gold rush theme that led to attendees digging up buried prizes.

10. ONE TUPPERWARE™ JUBILEE LED TO COUNTLESS LAWSUITS.

The 1957 Tupperware™ Jubilee went horribly awry due to dangerous weather. Wise planned an island party but when a thunderstorm threatened the beach luau, a panicked rush by the 1200 guests led to several boat accidents and 21 injured attendees. Tupperware™ spent several years in and out of courtrooms handling injury lawsuits.

11. TUPPERWARE'S™ SECRET WAS IN THE BURP.

The key to perfect food preservation lies in the Tupperware™ "burp," the process of closing the lid and reopening a small portion to let out any remaining air. Earl Tupper's idea for lid burping came from the practice of closing paint cans with the intention of creating an airtight seal. But, the burping process wasn’t easy for everyone, such as people with disabilities or difficulty using their hands. Tupperware™ introduced its Instant Seals line in the 1960s, featuring containers that could be closed with the push of a finger.

12. TUPPERWARE™ CREATED ITS OWN TOY.

At the height of Tupperware™ mania, the company began to sample plastic products outside of dishware, such as drawer organizers, portable lap desks, and fly swatters. With the baby boom well underway, Tupperware™ set out to create its own toy in the 1960s—the Shape-O. Kids have been popping geometric shapes into this large red and blue ball ever since.

13. TUPPERWARE™ CONTAINERS ARE IMPRINTED WITH BRAILLE.

In 1993, Tupperware™ looked to make food storage more accessible for people with visual impairments. The company launched its CrystalWave line in the early 1990s, including Braille on the bottom of containers to indicate volume.

14. BROWNIE WISE AND EARL TUPPER DIDN'T END ON GOOD TERMS.

While Tupperware™ has gone on to become a staple in kitchens nationwide, the team that made it a household staple wasn't nearly so indestructible. While Tupper and Wise didn’t always get along, their teamwork helped grow the company and its products. But by 1958, Tupper allegedly had enough of Wise’s ideas, extravagant spending and reputation as the "First Lady of Tupperware™"—not to mention the previous year's Jubilee disaster. Tupper supposedly told top Tupperware™ executives that he'd "had enough of Brownie Wise" and planned to fire her. Wise had no stock in the company and after battling Tupper in court, received one year’s salary as severance pay. Wise went on to dabble in her own home party cosmetics companies, though never found the same level of success as she had with Tupperware™. Tupper sold Tupperware™ within a year for $16 million, divorced his wife, and moved to Costa Rica. He died there in 1983; Wise died in 1992.

15. VINTAGE TUPPERWARE™ IS A HOT COLLECTIBLE.

Tupperware™ styles have changed with each decade to reflect new ideas, color schemes, and food storage needs. Older containers have become common collectibles and many sets, such as the iconic Wonderlier Bowls manufactured throughout the 1960s, sell for nearly $45 per set. Even the Smithsonian has its own stash of more than 100 Tupperware™ pieces, dating between 1946 and 1999. Who knew your fridge was housing such an important part of pop culture? Just make sure you don't lose any lids.

Amazon's Under-the-Radar Coupon Page Features Deals on Home Goods, Electronics, and Groceries

Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Now that Prime Day is over, and with Black Friday and Cyber Monday still a few weeks away, online deals may seem harder to come by. And while it can be a hassle to scour the internet for promo codes, buy-one-get-one deals, and flash sales, Amazon actually has an extensive coupon page you might not know about that features deals to look through every day.

As pointed out by People, the coupon page breaks deals down by categories, like electronics, home & kitchen, and groceries (the coupons even work with SNAP benefits). Since most of the deals revolve around the essentials, it's easy to stock up on items like Cottonelle toilet paper, Tide Pods, Cascade dishwasher detergent, and a 50 pack of surgical masks whenever you're running low.

But the low prices don't just stop at necessities. If you’re looking for the best deal on headphones, all you have to do is go to the electronics coupon page and it will bring up a deal on these COWIN E7 PRO noise-canceling headphones, which are now $80, thanks to a $10 coupon you could have missed.

Alternatively, if you are looking for deals on specific brands, you can search for their coupons from the page. So if you've had your eye on the Homall S-Racer gaming chair, you’ll find there's currently a coupon that saves you 5 percent, thanks to a simple search.

To discover all the deals you have been missing out on, head over to the Amazon Coupons page.

Sign Up Today: Get exclusive deals, product news, reviews, and more with the Mental Floss Smart Shopping newsletter!

10 Killer Facts About The Evil Dead

Bruce Campbell in The Evil Dead (1981).
Bruce Campbell in The Evil Dead (1981).
New Line Cinema

From Peter Jackson to Edgar Wright, Sam Raimi’s The Evil Dead has influenced many of today’s biggest directors. As it should. Famous for its practical effects and then-unprecedented amount of gore, the campy 1981 horror flick—about a group of friends who travel to a cabin in the woods and unleash killer demons—showed the world the power of guerilla-style indie filmmaking.

Raimi, star Bruce Campbell, and producer Robert Tapert fought through no CGI, sticky cocktails of blood made from everyday household items, and the reluctance of major studios to get on board to make a cult classic that has since spawned two sequels, Evil Dead II (1987) and Army of Darkness (1992); an Army of Darkness video game; a 2013 remake; Ash vs. Evil Dead, a TV series that ran for three seasons on Starz; and an upcoming fifth movie, Evil Dead Rise, that is planning to start production in 2021.

Get to know more about every cinephile’s favorite horror-comedy with this list of things you might not know about the production.

1. The Evil Dead was based on Sam Raimi’s short film, Within The Woods.

Before getting to work on The Evil Dead, good friends Robert Tapert, Sam Raimi, and Bruce Campbell created the 30-minute Super 8 film, Within the Woods. In a 1982 interview with John Gallagher, Raimi—who was 20 when he shot The Evil Dead—explained, “We used [Within the Woods] to show the investors what kind of film they’d be buying into … They needed tangible proof that we could make a movie of professional quality.”

On why the trio chose to make a horror film in the first place, producer Robert Tapert told The Incredibly Strange Film Show, “Sam and I first decided to do horror films after doing research on what did well in the markets ... Horror is the entry level that most people use.”

2. Joel Coen got his first break as an assistant editor on The Evil Dead.

Before becoming the Oscar-winning filmmaking duo he and his brother Ethan are today, Joel Coen got his start as an assistant editor on The Evil Dead. Inspired by Raimi’s DIY filmmaking, Joel and his brother created a pitch trailer (much like Raimi’s Within the Woods) to raise money for their first feature, Blood Simple. While Dan Hedaya stars in the final film, Bruce Campbell plays the lead in the two-minute trailer.

3. The Evil Dead, which is famous for its practical effects, even used real, live ammunition.

The meager budget on The Evil Dead didn’t allow for any star accouterments. As Bruce Campbell detailed to DVD talk, among the many hellish situations the cast and crew dealt with were diving into freezing cold swamps and Raimi getting chased by a bull. “We are going to rural Tennessee, 1979, where there's moonshine, squatters, and it was the real deal,” said Campbell. “The south was the south in 1979. There was no franchise this or franchise that. It was a completely different world and mentality ... We used real ammunition in the shotgun and we shot it at a real cabin in the woods, with hunters and howling dogs in the background.”

4. The Evil Dead’s infamous melting corpse is made up of everything from oatmeal to cockroaches.

Conscious of toeing the line of MPAA ratings, make-up and visual effects supervisor Tom Sullivan used different colors of goo to keep the body from seeming like it was spewing real blood. “I wanted to make it seem like their biology actually changed,” said Sullivan during the film’s 30th anniversary reunion, hosted by Spooky Empire. Among the many ingredients used to concoct the mush coming out of the melting corpse’s skull, Sullivan cites oatmeal, snakes, guts made out of marshmallow strings, and Madagascar cockroaches, which they acquired at Michigan State University.

5. Sam Raimi worked himself so hard on The Evil Dead that he passed out during filming.

Ellen Sandweiss in The Evil Dead (1981).Anchor Bay Entertainment

At Spooky Empire’s reunion, Bart Pierce, who worked on the visual effects of the film, noted just how much filming took a toll on Sam Raimi. As his story goes, Raimi fainted during the shooting of the film’s dismemberment sequence. The director stayed up all night shooting, and wrote all day, basically working himself 24/7. To wake him up, the crew took an ice-cold bucket of water and threw it at him, and left him there until he regained consciousness.

6. Everything in The Evil Dead was real—even the drugs.

Bruce Campbell has said it before: everything was real during filming. At a Spooky Empire event, Campbell playfully recalled, “The illegal substance known as marijuana was somehow forced upon us in Tennessee ... I was forced to ingest this marijuana by a local reprobate and I therefore became, let’s just say, affected by THC ... I therefore lost any sense of time and where I was, and that’s the time that Sam Raimi decided that he needed to shoot Ash having a breakdown.”

7. The Morristown, Tennessee cabin where The Evil Dead was shot has its own real-life horror story.

Adding to the spookiness of filming at an actual cabin in the woods, Raimi noted the location’s inherent eeriness is completely justified. During an interview with John Gallagher, Raimi recounted a horror story involving three generations of women (a grandmother, mother, and daughter) who previously occupied the cabin. “One night, during a thunderstorm, this little girl woke up and was scared by the lightning happening around the cabin. She ran into her mother’s room and pulling back the covers climbing into bed with her, she found that her mother was dead. She was so frightened she ran into her grandmother’s room and somehow that same evening, she had died also,” Raimi recalled. “The little girl ran into the storm ... to this little farmhouse and [the family living there] found her screaming and banging on the doors. They took care of her after that and no one lived in the cabin since. The [little girl], who’s now an old woman, during thunderstorms after that ... would often be found wandering around the woods.”

The kicker, however, was that story came to life during the film’s shoot. Raimi continued, “As we were shooting, this fella [from the farmhouse that took in the little girl] was looking for the [now old] woman, saying that because there was a thunderstorm the night before, he was looking for this woman, because it was possible that she had returned to the cabin ... As far as we know, they never found [her.]”

8. The most difficult moments during The Evil Dead shoot were stopping for months at a time to raise money.

According to Sam Raimi, the most difficult part of production wasn't the physical toll it took on the crew, but that they'd have to stop filming for months at a time to raise more money. “We’d reach stretches where we’d run out of money and have to stop whatever we were doing and put on our suits and get our briefcases and cut our hair short and shave ... and go around knocking on doors asking for more money," Raimi recalled. On initially raising money for the film, Raimi told the Incredibly Strange Film Show, “Tapert, Bruce Campbell, and myself ... all dropped out of school. Then we worked as waiters, bus boys, cab drivers. I was 18, Bruce was 19, and Robert was 22.” Added Campbell: “We’d sit down and pretend we were businessmen. We thought it was part of the process.”

In an episode of Dinner for Five, Campbell note another lucrative source of cash: dentists. “We had one guy give us money because he didn’t go to Vegas that year. He says ‘I usually take two grand and blow it in Vegas. Well, here’s my Vegas money.’ So he sends me 17 times his money. We were pretty happy about that.”

9. Sam Raimi regrets the infamous The Evil Dead scene where a teen girl is assaulted in—and by—the woods.

The initial release of the film was met with plenty of backlash worldwide, including being banned in Finland, Germany, Ireland, and Iceland for its extreme violence. Beyond the excessive blood, the scene in which Cheryl (Ellen Sandweiss) is assaulted by a tree caused an uproar among viewers and critics, and almost got the film banned from being released on home video. To this day, even Raimi regrets that scene. “It was unnecessarily gratuitous and a little too brutal,” Raimi tells the Incredibly Strange Film Show. “My goal was not to offend people ... My judgement was a little wrong at that time.”

10. Sam Raimi and Bruce Campbell started a rumor about an on-set injury on The Evil Dead as a joke.

Just to see who’d believe it, Campbell and Raimi spread a rumor that Campbell broke his jaw when Raimi accidentally slammed his camera into Campbell’s face while filming one of the final shots. Campbell put this rumor to rest at Dallas Comic Con, saying: “The lie that we put out was that the final shot [where] this evil entity comes racing through the cabin and crashes into my face ... The big lie is that... [Raimi] rode a motorcycle through all the doors and he just had to hit me ... I was willing to do it as long as we got [the shot], took it for the team ... But no, no broken jaw.”

This story has been updated for 2020.