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BaBoon Design

The Periodic Table of The Muppets

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BaBoon Design

Finally—a way to map out a family that includes a frog, a pig, a beatnik, an alien, three near-identical chickens, and a "whatever."

Canadian artist Mike Boon of Mike BaBoon Design has created the first-ever Muppet classification guide, a Periodic Table of legendary puppeteering genius Jim Henson’s best works of rainbow fur. His whimsical masterpiece features Muppets from the classic to the newly-stuffed, arranged on the table by debut year or production (the first row includes Kermit the Frog, Sam, Yorick, and Harry the Hipster from Henson’s 1950s series Sam and Friends) and by principal puppeteer. Borders and elemental symbols are coded by hair and nose color.

All of the old standbys are there—Kermit, Miss Piggy, Gonzo, Scooter, and the Swedish chef—as are newest characters Walter and the ‘80s Robot from the 2011 Jason Segal movie The Muppets. Nostalgic Muppet fans will recognize the familiar characters as well as some of the more obscure ones that Boon has included, such as the alien Mahna Mahna and silver-haired singer Johnny Fiama.

Boon says of the Henson menagerie, “There was something about the odd mix of family, heart, humour and chaos that always appealed to me… [I wanted] to incorporate a tribute to the valuable Muppeteers that have given these characters such strong personalities and voices over the years,” as well as highlight the characters that aren’t usually in the spotlight.

Boon’s other Muppet designs include two alphabets of Henson characters and a Fraggle Rock logo modeled after the Philadelphia LOVE sculpture. All are available on t-shirts, i-phone cases, posters, and prints. Börk Börk!

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Art
Artist Makes Colorful Prints From 1990s VHS Tapes

A collection of old VHS tapes offers endless crafting possibilities. You can use them to make bird houses, shelving units, or, if you’re London-based artist Dieter Ashton, screen prints from the physical tape itself.

As Co.Design reports, the recent London College of Communication graduate was originally intrigued by the art on the cover of old VHS and cassette tapes. He planned to digitally edit them as part of a new art project, but later realized that working with the ribbons of tape inside was much more interesting.

To make a print, Ashton unravels the film from cassettes and VHS tapes collected from his parents' home. He lets the strips fall randomly then presses them into tight, tangled arrangements with the screen. The piece is then brought to life with vibrant patterns and colors.

Ashton has started playing with ways to incorporate themes and motifs from the films he's repurposing into his artwork. If the movie behind one of his creations isn’t immediately obvious, you can always refer to its title. His pieces are named after movies like Backdraft, Under Siege, and that direct-to-video Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen classic Passport to Paris.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

[h/t Co.Design]

All images courtesy of Dieter Ashton

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photography
This Is What Flowers Look Like When Photographed With an X-Ray Machine
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Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Peruvian Daffodil” (1938)

Many plant photographers choose to showcase the vibrant colors and physical details of exotic flora. For his work with flowers, Dr. Dain L. Tasker took a more bare-bones approach. The radiologist’s ghostly floral images were recorded using only an X-ray machine, according to Hyperallergic.

Tasker snapped his pictures of botanical life while he was working at Los Angeles’s Wilshire Hospital in the 1930s. He had minimal experience photographing landscapes and portraits in his spare time, but it wasn’t until he saw an X-ray of an amaryllis, taken by a colleague, that he felt inspired to swap his camera for the medical tool. He took black-and-white radiographs of everything from roses and daffodils to eucalypti and holly berries. The otherworldly artwork was featured in magazines and art shows during Tasker’s lifetime.

Selections from Tasker's body of work have been seen around the world, including as part of the Floral Studies exhibition at the Joseph Bellows Gallery in San Diego in 2016. Prints of his work are also available for purchase from the Stinehour Wemyss Editions and Howard Greenberg Gallery.

Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Philodendron” (1938)
Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Philodendron” (1938)

X-ray image of a rose.
Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “A Rose” (1936)

All images courtesy of Joseph Bellows Gallery.

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