10 Japanese Travel Tips for Visiting America

iStock
iStock

With the help of Google Translate (and an ability to interpret completely random sentence structure), an American can find out what kind of advice the Japanese give to their own countrymen on how to handle the peculiarities of American culture. Here are some things to look out for if you are visiting America from Japan.

1. There is a thing called “Dinner Plates.” And what goes on them is a mighty disappointment.

In Japan, each person eating gets as many individual dishes as needed for the meal. Sometimes more than 10 dishes per person are used. In America, there is a method where a large bowl or dish is placed in the middle of the table, and you take as much as you like from there, and put it on a big dish said to be a "dinner plate."

In Japan, meals at home are for eating, because your stomach is vacant. At an American’s dinner, there is food, decorations on the table and tableware, and music to produce a fun atmosphere. It is a time for maintaining rich human relationships. Therefore, the meal is as long as 40 minutes. In addition, often the decorative tableware has been handed down mother to daughter, two generations, three generations. In addition, there are even more valuable dishes used for Christmas and Thanksgiving.

American food is flat to the taste, indifferent in the subtle difference of taste. There is no such thing there as a little “secret ingredient.” Sugar, salt, pepper, oils, and routine spices are used for family meals. There is no such thing as purely U.S. cuisine, except the hamburger, which isn’t made at home so much. There is almost nothing special to eat based on the different seasons of the year. Basically, they like sweet, high fat, high calories things.

2. Beware Rough Areas Where the Clothes Demand Attention

In Japan, hip hop clothes are considered stylish. But in the United States, it is wise to avoid them, as you might be mistaken for a member of a street gang.

The entire United States does not have good security, unfortunately. However, the difference between a place with good regional security and a “rough area” is clear. People walk less, there is a lot of graffiti, windows and doors are strictly fitted with bars. And young people are dressed in hip hop clothes that say "I want you to pay attention to me!"

3. But You’ll be Pleasantly Surprised by American Traffic Patterns.

Manners with cars in America are really damn good. Japanese people should be embarrassed when they look at how good car manners are in America. You must wait whenever you cross an intersection for the traffic light. People don’t get pushy to go first. Except for some people, everyone keeps exactly to the speed limit. America is a car society, but their damn good manners are not limited to cars.

4. Nobody is impressed by how much you can drink. In fact, shame on you.

In the U.S., they do not have a sense of superiority if they are able to drink a large amount. Rather, if you drink a lot, there is a sense that you cannot manage yourself. There is something close to contempt toward someone who must drink a lot to be drunk. To drink alcohol habitually is to have alcoholism. Alcoholics are weak people mentally, to be one means you have spanned the label of social outcasts that can’t self-manage.

Non-smokers are more important than smokers in the US. Smokers capture the concept that they are not able to control themselves, and are the owners of weak character.

5. They Have Free Time All Week Long!

In America, whether you are a student, working person, or housewife, you carefully make room for leisure time, weekdays and weekends. Most people are ensured free time, always. During the week they use it for walking, jogging, bicycling, tennis, racquetball, bowling, watching movies, reading, and volunteering. On the weekend, they enjoy even more freedom, and take liberal arts courses and have sporting leisures.

In Japan we believe that there is no free time during the weekday. Only the weekend. We spend the weekend watching TV, hanging around home, working, studying, and shopping, or listening to music.

See Also: 4 Russian Travel Tips for Visiting America

6. Knowing how to use sarcasm is a must to communicate with an American.

If you put your bent middle and index fingers of both hands in the air, you are making finger quotation marks. It means you do not believe what you are saying. You can also say, "or so called."

7. They tend to horse laugh, even the women. It’s how they show they’re honest.

In Japan, when a woman laughs, she places her hand so it does not show her mouth. It is disgraceful to laugh by loudly opening the mouth. Adult males do not laugh much. There is the saying, "Man, do not laugh so much that you show your teeth."

In America, when men or women laugh, they do not turn away. They face front, open the mouth, and laugh in a loud voice. This is because in America if you muffle your laugh or turn away while laughing, you give the impression that you are talking about a secret or name-calling. It is nasty.

See Also: 11 French Travel Tips for Visiting America

8. You won’t be getting your groceries anytime soon, so checkout lines are a great place to make friends.

Cashiers are slow. Abysmally slow compared to Japan. I get frustrated when I’m in a hurry. Americans wait leisurely even if you’re in the special checkout for buying just a little something. I thought Americans were going to be quite impatient, but in reality they are extremely laid back. I thought about what I should do with my time while waiting in the grocery matrix, and began to speak at length with other guests.

9. Their vending machines are ridiculously limited and dishonest.

Vending machines in the United States just give carbonated beverages. Coke particularly. If you try to buy the juice from a vending machine when you’re thirsty, it’s just all carbonate. I pressed the button and thought it would be a nice orange juice, but carbonate came out. I love carbonated, but there are times when it will make you sick indeed.

10. But darn it all, they’re so weirdly optimistic you just can’t stay irritated at them.

In Japan, there is great fear of failure and mistakes in front of other people. It is better to do nothing and avoid being criticized than to taste the humiliation of failure. As a result, there are things we wanted to do, but did not, and often regret.

In America, you can make mistakes, fail, and it doesn’t matter. It is a fundamental feeling that to sometimes be incorrect is natural. In addition, rather than thinking about mistakes and failures, American’s have curiosity and say, "Let’s try anyway!"

See Also:

38 Wonderful Words With No English Equivalent
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12 Old Words That Survived by Getting Fossilized in Idioms
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7 Tips for Keeping Your Man (from the 1950s)

Ingenious Moving Tips, According to Twitter

BartekSzewczyk/iStock via Getty Images
BartekSzewczyk/iStock via Getty Images

Whether or not you’ve outsourced the actual loading and unloading of your precious belongings to professional movers, the planning and packing process necessary for any move is enough to make even the most organized individuals contemplate climbing inside a cardboard box themselves.

To resist the urge, Twitter user “Shameless Maya” asked her followers to share their best tips and tricks for her own move—and, as was the case with hotel hacks last month, the Twittersphere rose to the occasion spectacularly. While it might be an exaggeration to say that these hacks will make moving fun, they can definitely help take the edge off your moving-day headache (or backache). Take a look through some of the most ingenious responses below, compiled by Thrillist.

1. Pack your dishes with your clothes.

Wrapping dishes and other fragile items in your sweaters and socks will not only keep you from generating extra waste with newspapers or packing peanuts, it’ll also save you some space. (@yuffieh_)

2. Protect your floors with a set of furniture sliders.

Even if the pros are packing your U-Haul, you will probably move your furniture around your new home while you’re getting set up. Prevent those beloved hardwood floors from getting scratched with these furniture sliders from Amazon. (@GabberWaukee)

3. Save space by packing with vacuum-sealed bags.

It’s impossible to accurately describe the awe you’ll feel—and the space you’ll save—when watching your vacuum-sealed bags shrink before your eyes. Turn your packing party into a consolidation station with this jumbo set from Amazon. (@HunniB_Rose)

4. Use trash bags as bulk garment bags.

Skip the hassle of taking your clothes off their hangers and wrap groups of them in large plastic trash bags. That way, they’ll stay on their hangers whether you’re packing them into boxes or wheeling them out on a portable rack. (@thegirllogan_)

5. Tape loose hardware to its corresponding furniture.

It’s easy to lose screws, washers, and other small hardware during a big move. Instead of throwing everything into a bag and hoping you’ll remember which tiny bits of metal go to what, just duct tape them to their corresponding furniture. (@NebFeminists)

6. Hit up department stores for free cardboard boxes.

Before you splurge on cardboard boxes that you’ll end up throwing out immediately after your move, see if department stores have any that they’d love to get rid of for free. (@jackseve)

7. Ask your local liquor store for special partitioned boxes.

And before you painstakingly wrap each and every glass you own, see if your local liquor store has a stash of those special partitioned cardboard boxes that bottles are often shipped in. (@SuzPageWrites)

8. Invest in a few of IKEA’s giant shopping bags.

Nothing beats IKEA’s big blue reusable shopping bags for transporting oddly shaped items or last-minute things you forgot to pack—they also make great laundry bags if you’re moving to a place without an in-unit washer and dryer. You can get a set of five for $12 from Amazon here. (@PaigeUnabridged)

[h/t Thrillist]

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don’t return, so we’re only happy if you’re happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

11 Gifts for the Home Improvement Guru in Your Life

Dia-Grip/Amazon
Dia-Grip/Amazon

Picking out the right gift for the handyperson on your list isn’t always easy. With so many choices out there and price tags that could quickly balloon, it’s important to do your research before making a commitment. Thankfully there are plenty of straight-forward tools and gadgets on the market that any home DIYer would love to have—and they don't have to wreck your holiday budget, either. Check out 11 gift recommendations for the home improvement guru in your life.

1. RAK Magnetic Wristband; $16

The RAK Magnetic Wristband is pictured
Amazon

Losing screws has to be among the biggest pet peeves of any DIYer. This magnetic wristband makes any job significantly less frustrating by keeping fasteners and accessories (screws, bolts, drill bits) within easy reach instead of on the floor or down a drain.

Buy it: Amazon

2. Vampliers; $45

A pair of Vampliers is pictured
Amazon

The unique, toothy design of the Vampliers's jaw makes it far easier to pull and cut wire, and grab hold of any stripped screw, bolt, or nut. For someone doing serious work around the house, this tool could save them a lot of elbow grease.

Buy it: Amazon

3. 5-in-1 Tool Pen; $25

The 5-in-1 Tool Pen from Uncommon Goods is pictured
Uncommon Goods

No matter what kind of job you’re tackling, a pen is mightier than most blunt-force instruments. This multi-use writing utensil allows you to scribble notes, measure levels, check a ruler, deploy a screwdriver, or use it as a stylus.

Buy it: Uncommon Goods

4. Stanley FuBar Demolition Bar; $25

The Stanley FuBar Demolition Bar is pictured
Walmart

Destroy anything—really, anything—with this forceful tool from the good people at Stanley. The pry bar can loosen nearly whatever you need, while the sharp end can do anything from trimming branches to splitting firewood.

Buy it: Walmart

5. General Tools LTM1 Laser Tape Measure; $30

The General Tools LTM1 Laser Tape Measure is pictured
Amazon

See how products measure up with this tape measure that uses a laser to beam to distances up to 50 feet. A conventional 16-foot analog tape measure is also included.

Buy it: Amazon

6. Little Giant Ladder; $229

The Little Giant Ladder is pictured
Amazon

Sometimes a plain ladder just won’t get you where you need to go. The Little Giant is the Swiss Army Knife of steps, allowing for a number of configurations from a 19-foot extension to a footprint that can be set on stairs and other awkward locations.

Buy it: Amazon

7. Dia-Grip Universal Socket Wrench; $18

The Dia-Grip Universal Socket Wrench is pictured
Amazon

No one enjoys searching for the right size socket for the job, so the Dia-Grip makes the choice for you. The socket wrench has steel pins that automatically configure to the bolt or nut you’re trying to attack, taking a lot of the guesswork off the user's plate.

Buy it: Amazon

8. Cartman Bungee Cords; $14

Cartman Bungee Cords are pictured
Amazon

Want to prevent your Christmas tree from ending up as a crumpled pile of broken pine needles in the middle of the highway? These elastic bungee cords allow you to haul items without worrying that they'll topple over or fall off the roof of your car. The 24 cords come in different sizes, so no matter how big of a tree you get this year, you'll still be able to secure it properly.

Buy it: Amazon

9. Rhino Strong Air Wedge; $24

The Rhino Strong Air Wedge is pictured
Amazon

When you need to get a heavy object off the ground for leveling or moving, all you have to do is push these inflatable bladders underneath, then use the hand pump. The resulting wedge can hold up to 300 pounds. Three sizes (small, medium, and large) are included.

Buy it: Amazon

10. Fix It Kit; $30

The Fix-It Kit from Uncommon Goods is pictured
Uncommon Goods

Sometimes you don’t necessarily need a contractor-grade tool set to get a simple job done. Alternately, you may want to keep a small assortment in a utility area or car. That’s where the Fix It Kit comes in. Inside a faux-leather case is a hammer, screwdriver, pliers, a flashlight, and other essentials. It's the perfect gift for someone in need of their first travel tool set.

Buy it: Uncommon Goods

11. Myivell LED Flashlight Glove; $13

The Mylivell LED flashlight glove is pictured
Amazon

Have a hands-on lighting source when working in dark spaces with these gloves. Each one has a small LED light located on the forefinger and thumb to illuminate your project. One size fits all.

Buy it: Amazon

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don’t return, so we’re only happy if you’re happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

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