Here's How Many People Grow Up to Hold Their Childhood Dream Job

iStock.com/chameleonseye
iStock.com/chameleonseye

When kids are told they can grow up to be whatever they want, they tend to dream big. According to a recent survey by TollFreeForwarding, high-paying and glamorous job titles like doctor, actor, and pro sports star are some of the most common childhood dream careers in America. But the same survey also found that just a small fraction of people go on to become what they wanted to be when they were young.

The virtual phone company surveyed 2000 adults in the U.S., asking them what career they dreamed of pursuing when they were teenagers. Public service jobs proved the most popular, with teacher, doctor/nurse, and vet making up the top three spots on the list. Those were followed by musician, actor, pro sports, and writer—all jobs that many kids associate with celebrities. Scientist, lawyer, and artist rounded out the top 10. (You can see the whole breakdown here.)

Of the people surveyed, only 10 percent reported holding their dream job today. The most common reasons they gave for not achieving their childhood dreams were financial limitations, a lack of skills, and prioritizing family. Only 39 percent of people who never landed their dream job said they regretted it.

That 10 percent may seem small, but TollFreeForwarding also found that an additional 14 percent of respondents had held their former dream job at some point in their lives, even if they don't have that job today. And dream jobs aren't always all they're made out to be—among the people surveyed who achieved their childhood dream, just 64 percent said it met their childhood expectations.

If you're still set on pursuing your dream job in light of these facts, there is a right way to go about it. Here are some tips for making your most ambitious career goals come true.

This Outdoor Lantern Will Keep Mosquitoes Away—No Bug Spray Necessary

Thermacell, Amazon
Thermacell, Amazon

With summer comes outdoor activities, and with those activities come mosquito bites. If you're one of the unlucky people who seem to attract the insects, you may be tempted to lock yourself inside for the rest of the season. But you don't have to choose between comfort and having a cocktail on the porch, because this lamp from Thermacell ($25) keeps outdoor spaces mosquito-free without the mess of bug spray.

The device looks like an ordinary lantern you would display on a patio, but it works like bug repellent. When it's turned on, a fuel cartridge in the center provides the heat needed to activate a repellent mat on top of the lamp. Once activated, the repellent in the mat creates a 15-by-15-foot bubble of protection that repels any mosquitos nearby, making it a great option for camping trips, days by the pool, and backyard barbecues.

Mosquito repellent lantern.

Unlike some other mosquito repellents, this lantern is clean, safe, and scent-free. It also provides light like a real lamp, so you can keep pests away without ruining your backyard's ambience.

The Thermacell mosquito repellent lantern is now available on Amazon. If you've already suffered your first mosquito bites of the summer, here's some insight into why that itch can be so excruciating.

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This Is Not a Drill: Oscar Mayer's Wienermobile Is Hiring New Drivers for 2020

Tim Boyle, Getty Images
Tim Boyle, Getty Images

The Oscar Mayer Wienermobile has had many navigators over its 84-year history, including performers and a race car driver. Now, the Oscar Mayer company is looking for a new generation of 'hotdoggers' to get behind the wheel of the iconic ride.

Food & Wine reports that applications are being accepted for the one-year position now through January 31. Hotdoggers tasked with commandeering the Wienermobile will be responsible for doing media interviews and appearing at grocery store and charity events across the country. The position is primarily a PR job, and candidates with a BA or BS in public relations, journalism, communications, advertising, or marketing are preferred.

Carl Mayer, Oscar Mayer's nephew, introduced the first Wienermobile in 1936, and today there are six vehicles on the road making up to 1400 stops a year. After disappearing for a couple decades, the Wienermobile was revived in 1986 for its 50th anniversary. Oscar Mayer hires 12 new hotdoggers each year and usually receives more than 1000 applications.

The job comes with benefits and a competitive salary in addition to the impressive title. The new hires must be ready to hit the road in June of this year; for a shot at becoming Oscar Mayer's next Wienermobile driver, apply by the end of the month here.

[h/t Food & Wine]