Want to take naps at work without getting into trouble? Move to Japan. The practice of inemuri—which roughly translates to “sleeping on duty” or “sleeping while present”—is surprisingly well accepted.

It’s just one of the unique sleeping habits featured in an infographic from Plank by Brooklyn Bedding. Created in recognition of National Sleep Awareness Month (which is happening right now), it includes information about sleeping patterns and behaviors around the world, from the healthy to the not-so-healthy.

Japan appears in the infographic a couple of times. In addition to sleeping on thin tatami mats, the habit of dozing off in public or at work is regarded as “a show of how tired a person is from working so hard,” according to the bedding company. While it’s certainly a symptom of an overworked culture, it’s also a luxury in some ways. Because of the country’s low crime rate, Japanese commuters can typically sleep on the subway without worrying about their belongings being stolen.

Beyond Asia, the practice of “al fresco naps” in Scandinavian countries are another cultural quirk. Many parents take their babies and toddlers outside to sleep in the winter—even in temperatures as low as 20 degrees Fahrenheit. That’s because the fresh air is believed to keep them healthy and ward off illness. They also believe outdoor naps improve the quality and duration of their sleep.

In Australia, Aboriginal communities engage in “group sleep”—essentially large slumber parties, but with a more practical purpose. “Beds or mattresses are lined up in a row with the strongest people sleeping on the ends, protecting young children or elderly in the middle,” Brooklyn Bedding writes.

Check out the infographic below to learn more about sleep habits around the world, including the reason why 30 percent of people in the UK sleep naked.

Plank by Brooklyn Bedding