This Digital Artist Creates Museum-Worthy Video Game Illustrations

Orioto's piece "Chinese Street" based off the "Street Fighter" video game franchise
Orioto's piece "Chinese Street" based off the "Street Fighter" video game franchise
Courtesy of Orioto

Whether you enjoy bopping around as Mario or exhaustedly flopping like a ragdoll toward bed, there is a gaming experience for everyone. But separate from developing illustrations and animations for video games themselves, there are a number of cottage-industry artists making their own distinct pieces based on the games they love. One such digital artist, Paris-based Mikaël Aguirre, who goes by Orioto online, has taken an almost classical approach to creating fine art out of these games.

"There is something that fascinated me about the graphics and the way you could interact with something from someone else's imagination," Aguirre tells Mental Floss. "That's mostly what video games are for me, so by working on those memories I try to give them some sort of anachronistic echo in digital paintings."

Aguirre's love of video games began much like anyone else's, when he was 11 years old. Video games to him, more so than other mediums, have the ability to channel emotion in a particularly special way. He cites Final Fantasy VI—released in 1994 on the SNES—as his favorite game of all time. It left an indelible mark on him in both an aesthetic and poetic sense. Because of that, Final Fantasy is one of the big franchises he returns to for inspiration the most.

Orioto's piece "To Zanarkand" based off the video game "Final Fantasy X"
Orioto's piece "To Zanarkand," based on the video game "Final Fantasy X."
Courtesy of Orioto

The name Orioto, Aguirre says, is an homage to Japanese anime director Kōji Morimoto, whose career notably includes being an artist for the 1988 classic Akira and 2003's The Animatrix, which was inspired by the 1999 Keanu Reeves sci-fi flick The Matrix.

Aguirre also takes inspiration from less contemporary artists, like the 19th-century Russian figures Ivan Shishkin and Ivan Aivazovsky, or British landscape artists like Alfred Glendening, among others. He says some of his work—which includes more than 350 digital paintings covering the full spectrum of video game history—directly references those artists and creators.

Orioto's piece "30 Years of Mario" based off the "Super Mario" video game franchise
Orioto's piece "30 Years of Mario," based on the "Super Mario" video game franchise.
Courtesy of Orioto

But before his portfolio grew to what it is today—including illustrative work for media companies like Polygon and decorative commissions for the online entertainment company Kinda Funny (such as the background set it uses)—Aguirre started small. He began by playing around with Photoshop when he got his first PC in 1999, when he was 18 and had just finished his final exams for school. Five years later, he began posting some of his work on the online community site DeviantArt.

Orioto's piece "A New Sky" based off the video game "No Man's Sky"
Orioto's piece "A New Sky," based on the video game "No Man's Sky."
Courtesy of Orioto

"I never even studied graphic design, but I was curious and resilient!" Aguirre says. "Photoshop is like a giant emergent game where you can find many ways to reach a certain result."

He's certainly mastered the mechanics of Photoshop. Usually, digital artists make their work available in various online stores, and they can sometimes be found at gaming conventions like E3 and Comic-Con. Aguirre works independently, which allows him to freelance for companies, do his passion projects, and interact with his Patreon donors, who have the opportunity to vote on some of the art illustrations he'll do next, whether it's a piece based on Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice or a more obscure title like Ristar from the Sega Genesis days.

Orioto's piece "Journey's End" based off the video game "The Last of Us"
Orioto's piece "Journey's End," based on the video game "The Last of Us."
Courtesy of Orioto

Some pieces Aguirre are most proud of include illustrations based on Hollow Knight, Another World, Final Fantasy X, and the cinematic post-apocalyptic journey of The Last of Us (above) from developer Naughty Dog. In the future, Aguirre hopes to incorporate elements of French Impressionism in his pieces, and perhaps one day even make video games himself.

To get your hands on some of Aguirre's work, you can check out his store on Redbubble or subscribe to his Patreon.

Bob Ross's Son Is Holding Painting Classes at a Tennessee Library

Bob Ross.
Bob Ross.
Bob Ross Inc.

For anyone who has ever logged on to the internet, Bob Ross needs no introduction. The painter, who passed away in 1995, spent the years 1983 through 1994 hosting the PBS series The Joy of Painting, where his soothing manner and bubbling-spring landscapes comforted viewers.

On several episodes, Bob’s son, Steve Ross, could be seen painting his own nature scenes as guest host or assisting his father in answering reader questions.

According to WVLT, Steve Ross is now set to offer painting classes at the Blount County Public Library in Maryville, Tennessee. He will be joined by Dana Jester, an artist who also appeared on The Joy of Painting. The workshops will be held March 4 through March 8 and will cost $125 per attendee, who will also be expected to bring their own supplies. The classes will last the entire day.

If locals are curious and don’t want to commit to the fee, Steve and Dana will be hosting a free demonstration on March 5 at 6:30 p.m.

After his guest spots on his father’s program, Steve appeared to retreat from public life, though clips of his appearances were apparently popular on Tumblr for their inadvertently risqué banter. (“It can be dirty, it doesn’t have to be clean,” and so forth.)

Bob Ross also taught classes even while The Joy of Painting was airing. He purportedly received no income from that show, earning a living via merchandising and appearances.

[h/t WVLT]

New Website Shows You What Synesthesia Looks Like

This is how Bernadette Sheridan, who has grapheme-color synesthesia, sees the name Aiden.
This is how Bernadette Sheridan, who has grapheme-color synesthesia, sees the name Aiden.
Bernadette Sheridan, Etsy

If you happen to find yourself seeing music, smelling color, or unusually combining two other senses, you may have synesthesia, a possibly genetic condition that affects about 4 percent of the population.

Since synesthetes perceive the world in such a unique way, it’s perhaps unsurprising that many of them pursue work in a creative field. Billy Joel, Vincent van Gogh, and Pharrell Williams are just a few examples of well-known artistic synesthetes.

For the rest of us, the whole concept can be a little hard to wrap our minds around. To help us out—and to help herself make sense of her own senses—artist Bernadette Sheridan created a website called Synesthesia.Me that illustrates grapheme-color synesthesia, which causes her to see letters as colors. If you type in a word or phrase, the site will produce a row of color blocks that correspond to those letters.

synesthesia.me color-blocks for 'mental floss'
We think our color blocks match our personality perfectly.
Bernadette Sheridan, Synesthesia.Me

As Sheridan explains in a post on Medium’s health and wellness vertical, Elemental, each person’s grapheme-color synesthesia manifests itself differently, so the letter-color combinations on Synesthesia.Me are specific to how Sheridan sees words. That said, there are some common combinations across many synesthetes—the letter A, for instance, is often seen as red.

Not only is the site a fascinating foray into the mind of a grapheme-color synesthete, it could also help you bring a bright, personalized pop of color into your home: Sheridan runs an Etsy shop where she sells prints of the color blocks. She’ll email you a high-resolution, printable portrait of any name or word for just $12, or you can order an already-framed version for $96. Looking for a special engagement or anniversary gift? Sheridan also makes them with two names.

bernadette sheridan etsy synesthesia portrait
Dawn and Pete make a colorful couple.
Bernadette Sheridan, Etsy

[h/t Medium]

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