Mayfield Lavender in Banstead, UK, an hour outside London, is just as much a treat for the olfactory system as it is for the eyes. The English lavender farm features rolling fields of fragrant plants, and according to Condé Nast Traveler, the site is open to visitors when the flowers are in bloom from June to September.

Originally a Victorian lavender field, the farm was revived in the 2000s by Brendan Maye, who was working in the fine fragrance division of Wella UK at the time. He convinced the company to grow lavender as a marketing stunt, and when the business was acquired by Proctor & Gamble in 2005, he bought the farm and incorporated it under his own name. With help from his wife Lorna, he transformed Mayfield Lavender into a tourist attraction.

The lavender farm opens to the public every year on June 1, with the flowers reaching peak bloom from late June to early September. For £2.50 (about $3.17), guests can wander the 25-acre farm, taking in the sights and scents. When the attraction closes on September 2, visitors can tour the Mayfield nursery and shop in Epsom that's open all year.

If you can't make it to England this lavender season, you can seek out the flowers in the U.S. The town of Shelby, Michigan is home to a massive lavender labyrinth that's visible on Google Earth.

Jack Taylor/Getty Images

Jack Taylor/Getty Images

Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

[h/t Condé Nast Traveler]