10 Surprising Facts About Animal Sex

iStock/Dias Studio
iStock/Dias Studio

Homo sapiens do not have a monopoly on strange sex. Peculiar mating rituals are prevalent throughout the animal kingdom. While writing my book Sex Weird-o-Pedia, these were the 10 most interesting animal sex facts I came across.

1. Turtle mating sounds make for good special effects.

It turns out that animal mating sounds can be really useful for capturing people’s attention. When the filmmakers of Jurassic Park wanted to create velociraptor sounds, they used recordings of tortoises getting it on.

2. Sharks have versatile birthing methods.

Rare close-up encounter with wild endangered species Zebra Leopard Shark (Stegostoma fasciatum
iStock/Placebo365

Australian scientists claim to have found a shark that gives virgin births. They studied a female zebra shark named Leonie, who laid eggs despite not being around a male shark in three years. Several years before her virgin birth, Leonie gave birth after mating with a male shark. She is believed to be the first known shark to reproduce both sexually and asexually.

3. Worms have really long dry spells.

You think it's been a long time since you've been intimate with someone? You've got nothing on worms. After sequencing the DNA of asexual translucent worms, NYU researchers discovered that one species, Diploscapter pachys, had not had sex for about 18 million years. This makes Diploscapter pachys one of the oldest known asexual species.

4. Fine fragrances turn big cats on.

Calvin Klein colognes have sex appeal to animals, too. Captive tigers and jaguars have become stimulated by the brand’s Obsession for Men scent. Forest rangers have used the scent to lure tigers out of the wild.

5. Barnacles have adaptable penises.

A close-up of barnacles on a rock
iStock/Photoshopped

Barnacles may have the most interesting penises in the animal kingdom. Their penises can stretch up to eight times the length of their body. And while many species' manhoods can change size, few can alter their shape. But researchers in Alberta found that barnacles that live in gentle waters have long and thin penises that are good for reach, while those in rough waters have short and wider penises that are better for holding off strong waves. The researchers then transported rough water barnacles to calmer waters and vice versa and found that after getting moved around, the barnacles adjusted their penis's shape to better fit their environment.

6. Water bugs mate loudly.

The water bug species Micronecta scholtzi are the loudest animal in the world relative to their size. The tiny critter reaches nearly 100 decibels when it rubs its penis against its abdomen. Basically, there is a rock concert going on whenever this bug releases a mating call.

7. Ducks defend themselves with their vaginas.

Duck penises can be terrifying: They are long and corkscrew-shaped and they can be used like a lasso to pull in females who are trying to escape unwanted advances. To fend off unwelcome mating attempts from overeager males, female ducks have evolved vaginas that twist in the opposite direction of their male counterparts’s corkscrew penises. Discover magazine referred to duck vaginas as “organic chastity belts."

8. Most birds don’t have penises.

Close-up of an ostrich
iStock/sasapanchenko

Just 3 percent of bird species have penises. Ostriches and ducks have them, but eagles and penguins do not. When birds get erections, their penises fill up with lymph fluid instead of blood. Birds without penises transfer sperm from male to female via what is known as a cloacal kiss.

9. Male birds are desperate to impress potential mates.

As long as humans have been on Earth, guys have done incredibly stupid things to try to impress women. Male birds are not immune to this dynamic.

Little birds like chickadees will group together to take on larger predators. It has generally been assumed that they do this for protection purposes, but researchers in Brazil came to a different conclusion: The researchers created a few fake owls, one from a species that regularly eats smaller birds and another from a less threatening owl species. They found that across 79 different species of small birds, the less threatening owl was attacked more often by the smaller birds. Their conclusion was that the small birds used the weaker opponent as an opportunity to showcase their defense skills to potential mates.

10. Unlike humans, animals have gotten frisky in space.

According to NASA, no humans have ever had sex in space. But other animal species have been more active with their sexuality and reproductivity outside our atmosphere.

The first pregnant mammals to fly in outer space aboard a U.S. spacecraft were rats, and frogs have conceived in orbit.

In an effort to better understand how reproduction works in the absence of gravity, Russia’s space agency launched five geckos into orbit in 2014 so that they could observe how the lizards had sex in space. Sadly, the geckos froze to death before they touched back down to Earth.

In 2018, NASA scientists began a mission that involved sending human and bull sperm to outer space. Their intention was to study how microgravity affects the motility of sperm cells. Because if humans are to ever colonize space, we must boldly bone where no one has boned before.

Ross Benes is the author of the new book Sex Weird-o-Pedia: The Ultimate Book of Shocking, Scandalous, and Incredibly Bizarre Sex Facts.

The Reason Why a Puppy in North Carolina Was Born Bright Green

Anastasiia Cherniavskaia, iStock via Getty Images
Anastasiia Cherniavskaia, iStock via Getty Images

When a dog owner in Canton, North Carolina, first saw her new puppy, she knew exactly what to name him. Hulk the infant pup is much smaller than his namesake, but like the comic book character, he's green from head to toe.

As WLOS reports, Hulk was born with a coat of fur the color of avocado toast. He is one of eight puppies in a litter a white German Shepherd named Gypsy delivered the morning of January 10. Even though one came out lime-green, it was healthy, normal birth, according to Gypsy's owner Shana Stamey.

Hulk's unique coloration isn't a sign of any health issues. Meconium—or the matter in the intestines of a fetus—is mostly made of water, but it can also contain something called biliverdin. This chemical makes bile, and when it gets into the amniotic fluid of a birth sac, it can stain a puppy's fur green. This is especially noticeable when the newborn's fur is white, as in Hulk's case. You can see the rare phenomenon in the video below.

After a few weeks of baths and licks from mom, the meconium stains will eventually fade to reveal his natural white coat. But while he won't be green forever, Hulk gets to keep his colorful name for life.

[h/t WLOS]

Not-So-Fancy Feast: Your Cat Probably Would Eat Your Rotting Corpse

Tycson1/iStock via Getty Images
Tycson1/iStock via Getty Images

Cat enthusiasts often cite the warmth and companionship offered by their pet as reasons why they’re so enamored with them. Despite these and other positive attributes, cat lovers are often confronted with the spurious claim that, while their beloved furry pal might adore them when they’re alive, it won’t hesitate to devour their corpse if they should drop dead.

Though that’s often dismissed as negative cat propaganda spread by dog people, it turns out that it’s probably true. Fluffy might indeed feast on your flesh if you happened to expire.

A horrifying new case study published in the Journal of Forensic Sciences offers the fresh evidence. The paper, first reported by The Washington Post, documents how two cats reacted in the presence of a corpse at Colorado Mesa University’s Forensic Investigation Research Station, or body farm, where the deceased are used to further forensic science for criminal investigations.

The study’s authors did not orchestrate a meeting between cat and corpse. The finding happened by accident: Student and lead author Sara Garcia was scanning surveillance footage of the grounds when she noticed a pair of cats trespassing. The cats, she found, were interested in the flesh of two corpses; they gnawed on human tissue while it was still in the early stages of decomposition, stopping only when the bodies began leaching fluids.

The cats, which were putting away one corpse each, didn’t appear to have a taste for variety, as they both returned to the same corpse virtually every night. The two seemed to prefer the shoulder and arm over other body parts.

This visual evidence joins a litany of reports over the years from medical examiners, who have observed the damage left by both cats and dogs who were trapped in homes with deceased owners and proceeded to eat them. It’s believed pets do this when no other food source is available, though in some cases, eating their human has occurred even with a full food bowl. It’s something to consider the next time your cat gives you an affectionate lick on the arm. Maybe it loves you. Or maybe it has something else in mind.

[h/t The Washington Post]

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