The Most Popular Thanksgiving Dishes in Each State

jenifoto/iStock via Getty Images
jenifoto/iStock via Getty Images

Ask someone what they eat at Thanksgiving dinner and the answer will likely depend on where they're from. Though some dishes, like turkey, are considered holiday staples across the country, others are rarely seen outside certain regions. To get an idea of how Thanksgiving menus vary from state to state, check out these maps from House Method.

To determine the most-searched sweet and savory Thanksgiving recipes in each state, the homeowners' resource investigated which food-related terms Americans are Googling this time of year.

Roast turkey dominated the eastern half of the U.S., topping Thanksgiving recipe search trends in nine states from Florida to Massachusetts. It turns out that people from the Bluegrass State like all of their poultry fried: Kentucky was the only state where the search term "deep fried turkey" came out No.1.

Sweet potato casserole is popular in the South, while in Midwestern states they're searching for green bean casserole, and out in Utah, Nevada, and California, they're looking for yams (though they likely mean sweet potatoes).

House Method also made a map for the people who consider dessert the best part of Thanksgiving. Pumpkin pie is the most popular sweet dish on the Thanksgiving table by far, topping search results in 15 states. The map below shows that sweet potato pie is preferred in Southeastern states like North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia, and pecan pie is the favorite of Southern states slightly to the West like Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas.

Most popular Thanksgiving desserts map.
House Method

After seeing what your state likes to serve on Thanksgiving, check out the origins of your favorite Thanksgiving recipes.

[h/t House Method]

Relax: Fears of a French Fry Shortage Are Probably Overblown

magann/iStock via Getty Images
magann/iStock via Getty Images

Americans love their French fries. According to The New York Times, Americans eat an average of an average of 115.6 pounds of white potatoes annually, "of which two-thirds are in the form of French fries, potato chips and other frozen or processed potato products."

If you’re someone who annually devours the weight of a small child in fries at McDonald's or elsewhere, you’ll be distressed that potato farmers are facing a shortage—one that could create a fry crisis. But these concerns are likely overblown.

According to Bloomberg, a cold snap in October led to crop-threatening frosts at potato farms in Manitoba in Canada, as well as in North Dakota and Minnesota. In Manitoba, 12,000 acres went unharvested, the equivalent to what was left behind in all of Canada last season. Fields in Idaho and Alberta, Canada, were also hit, but some crops were able to be salvaged. Combined with increased demand in Canada for spuds, North America is looking at a potential tuber deficit.

Why are fries facing shortages, but not mashed potatoes? Fry vendors prefer bigger potatoes for slicing, which tend to be harvested later in the year and were subject to ground freezing and other damage.

This all sounds like cause for national alarm, but the spud industry has taken measures to keep the market fed. Potato experts told Bloomberg that while potato shipments will likely have to be rerouted from more fertile farms and into new distribution channels, the consumer may not notice any difference. A plea for rational thought was echoed by Frank Muir, president of Idaho Potato Commission. Muir told The New York Times that while Idaho is down 1 billion spuds, the state still managed 13 billion. His message to consumers is “Don’t panic … You can still go out and order them as you normally do.”

According to Muir, the major fast food chains—McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King, among others—have temperature-controlled storage for their potatoes and probably have an inventory to fall back on. Rationing won't be needed—unless, of course, you’re watching your weight.

[h/t Bloomberg]

It’s National Cookie Day! Here’s Where to Score Some Free Treats

UMeimages/iStock via Getty Images
UMeimages/iStock via Getty Images

If you plan on eating as many baked goods as possible this December, now's your chance to get a head start. Today—December 4—is National Cookie Day, and chains across the country are celebrating by handing out free cookies. Here are the best places to snag a treat before the day is over.

    • Great American Cookies, a chain that's concentrated in the southeastern U.S., is marking the day by rewarding members of its loyalty program. If you already have the loyalty app, you can swing by a participating location any time today and pick up your free original chocolate chip cookie without making any additional purchases. The promotion only applies to customers who signed up for the program before midnight on December 3, so you aren't eligible for the free snack if you download the app on your way to the store.
    • The cookie giant Mrs. Fields is also participating in the holiday. Buy anything from one of the chain's stores on December 4 and you'll get a free cookie with your purchase. If you spring for the Nutcracker Sweet Tower, which is made from five festive containers of baked goods, you can send a Mrs. Fields Peace, Love & Cookies 30 Nibbler Tin to a friend for free.
    • But what if you're looking for a free cookie with no strings attached? Surprisingly, a hotel chain may be offering the best deal for National Cookie Day. Throughout December 4, you can stop by a DoubleTree by Hilton and ask for a free cookie at the front desk. DoubleTree provides complimentary cookies to guests at check-in all year round, and every year on National Cookie Day, the hotel chain extends that offer to everyone.

There's no shortage of great cookies across the U.S. If you're willing to travel to satisfy your sweet tooth, here are the best chocolate chip cookies in all 50 states.

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