The Very Particular Details of Emily Dickinson's Funeral

Three Lions/Getty Images
Three Lions/Getty Images

After suffering from a long period of illness, Dickinson died on May 15, 1886. (She was diagnosed as having Bright’s Disease, but modern scholars believe she died of heart failure brought on by high blood pressure.) She was 55. Since so many of Emily’s poems focused on death and immortality, it should come as no surprise that she had very specific plans she wished to be followed upon her passing.

In keeping with her particular penchant for wearing white while she was alive, Dickinson had requested the color wherever possible at her funeral. According to one Emily Dickinson biography, the coffin was white, the casket lining was white, the handles were white, and it was all adorned with ribbon that was — you guessed it — white. Emily herself wore a robe of white flannel.

Her specifications didn’t end there. She requested that the honorary pallbearers, including professors and the president of Amherst College, carry her coffin just out the door of her beloved family house, Homestead. But once they crossed the threshold, six men who worked for the Dickinson family carried her to the graveyard.

Even the route to the cemetery was completely calculated. According to Emily’s instructions, the funeral party circled her flower garden, walked through a barn behind the house, then meandered across buttercup fields to get to West Cemetery.

She's still there to this day, although at least one thing has changed since her carefully planned funeral. When Dickinson was buried in 1886, it was under a simple stone bearing her initials, "E.E.D." Her niece later replaced it with a taller stone bearing Dickinson's full name, and a quote from a letter she sent to her cousins shortly before her death: "Called back."

Midnightdreary via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY­SA 3.0

Wayfair’s Fourth of July Clearance Sale Takes Up to 60 Percent Off Grills and Outdoor Furniture

Wayfair/Weber
Wayfair/Weber

This Fourth of July, Wayfair is making sure you can turn your backyard into an oasis while keeping your bank account intact with a clearance sale that features savings of up to 60 percent on essentials like chairs, hammocks, games, and grills. Take a look at some of the highlights below.

Outdoor Furniture

Brisbane bench from Wayfair
Brisbane/Wayfair

- Jericho 9-Foot Market Umbrella $92 (Save 15 percent)
- Woodstock Patio Chairs (Set of Two) $310 (Save 54 percent)
- Brisbane Wooden Storage Bench $243 (Save 62 percent)
- Kordell Nine-Piece Rattan Sectional Seating Group with Cushions $1800 (Save 27 percent)
- Nelsonville 12-Piece Multiple Chairs Seating Group $1860 (Save 56 percent)
- Collingswood Three-Piece Seating Group with Cushions $410 (Save 33 percent)

Grills and Accessories

Dyna-Glo electric smoker.
Dyna-Glo/Wayfair

- Spirit® II E-310 Gas Grill $479 (Save 17 percent)
- Portable Three-Burner Propane Gas Grill $104 (Save 20 percent)
- Digital Bluetooth Electric Smoker $224 (Save 25 percent)
- Cuisinart Grilling Tool Set $38 (Save 5 percent)

Outdoor games

American flag cornhole game.
GoSports

- American Flag Cornhole Board $57 (Save 19 percent)
- Giant Four in a Row Game $30 (Save 6 percent)
- Giant Jenga Game $119 (Save 30 percent)

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See What the First Costco Looked Like in 1983

Mike Mozart, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Mike Mozart, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

For many consumers who like to buy cheese, toilet paper, and clothing in bulk, Costco is essential. The big box chain is a success today, but when it launched nearly 40 years ago, selling wholesale goods to the public was still a new concept. If you need help imagining a world where Costco wasn't a household name, check the video below from Business Insider.

In this segment, Business Insider covers the history of Costco, starting with its humble beginnings to its current position as an industry leader. The video also features photos of the very first Costco location in Seattle. When Costco first opened in 1983, an annual club membership cost just $20. Adjusted for inflation, that's roughly equivalent to today's membership price of $60 a year. By the end of 1984, Costco had sold 200,000 memberships.

Costco's success isn't limited to its bulk groceries and toiletries. The store's cafeterias are hugely popular, and depending on how you define a pizza franchise, Costco ranks among the top 20 biggest pizza chains in the country. Costco is even a major player in the fashion industry, selling more clothes than Old Navy.

Even with its cheap offerings, Costco has managed to become a $1 billion company. Here are some more surprising facts about the beloved chain.

[h/t Business Insider]