The Helvetica Font Has Been Revamped for the First Time in Decades

Monotype
Monotype

The Helvetica font family is everywhere. It’s used on everything from subway signage to federal tax forms to advertisements for a diverse group of companies, including Harley-Davidson, Oral-B, and Target. Job seekers are also likely familiar with its clean, sans-serif characters, which make it one of the best fonts for a resume.

“If it's me, [I’m using] Helvetica,” Matt Luckhurst, a graphic designer, told Bloomberg in 2015. “Helvetica is beautiful. There is only one Helvetica.”

Until now. As Wired reports, the typeface has just been revamped for the first time in decades by Monotype, which boasts the world’s largest type library and owns the rights to Helvetica. The new and improved version, called Helvetica Now, aims to better serve modern users while also working out the kinks associated with the old design.

The new Helvetica font
Monotype

While Helvetica is still ubiquitous, several major companies—including Google, Apple, IBM, and Netflix—have dropped the typeface for branding purposes in recent years. Issues related to kerning, punctuation sizes, and scrunched characters are all common gripes with the old version.

By contrast, Helvetica Now comes in three versions to suit different needs. There’s a Micro version for small screens, a Display version for larger type sizes, and a Text version that makes use of white space to offset visually “demanding” designs. Companies will need to buy the license to the new Helvetica, but the font’s creators are hopeful that everyone will be making the switch in due time.

“Helvetica Now is the tummy-tuck, facelift, and lip filler we’ve been wanting, but were too afraid to ask for,” graphic designer Abbott Miller, a partner at design consultancy Pentagram, said in a statement. “It offers beautifully drawn alternates to some of Helvetica’s most awkward moments, giving it a surprisingly, thrillingly contemporary character.”

The original Helvetica was invented in 1957 by two Swiss designers who dubbed their typeface Neue Haas Grotesk. It wasn’t until 1961 that the typeface was renamed Helvetica, and the font’s last major facelift came in 1982 with the release of the desktop-friendly Neue Helvetica.

Of course, that was pre-internet, and Monotype’s director, Charles Nix, says everyone's font needs have changed a great deal in the intervening decades. “Neue Helvetica was the first digitization of Helvetica,” Nix said. “That was a long time ago, and so much has happened in our world since then.”

[h/t Wired]

This Is What the Rooms From Famous Paintings Look Like in Real Life

HomeAdvisor
HomeAdvisor

If you're looking for interior design inspiration, check out the work of famous artists. Some of the most memorable pieces from painters like Vincent Van Gogh, Grant Wood, and Roy Lichtenstein depict ordinary rooms in colorful styles. Now, the digital home improvement marketplace HomeAdvisor has made recreating these scenes in your own home as easy as possible: The images below translate six rooms from iconic paintings into real life.

To bring these artworks in the real world, HomeAdvisor created computer-generated models, taking liberties with some details to make the spaces feel more convincing. In the recreation of Van Gogh's The Bedroom—originally inspired the painter's room in Arles, France—the colors have been toned down slightly, but the cozy, peaceful atmosphere remains. Roy Lichtenstein’s Interior With Restful Paintings has been transformed from a pop art painting to a mod living room with splashes of color.

There's a painting for every design style, from Konstantin Korovin's rustic kitchen to Eduard Petrovich Hau's lavish sitting room fit for royalty. You can check out every artwork and the digital model it inspired by watching the GIFs below.

Want more ways to bring an artistic touch to your living space? Here are some suggestions for using color in your home.

Real-life version of Konstantin Korovin’s ‘Interior’
HomeAdvisor

Real-life version of Kandinsky’s ‘My Dining Room’
HomeAdvisor

Real-life version of Grant Wood’s ‘The Sun Shine on the Corner’
HomeAdvisor

Real-life version of Roy Lichtenstein’s ‘Interior with restful paintings’
HomeAdvisor

Real-life version of Vincent Van Gogh's painting.
HomeAdvisor

Real-life version of Eduard Petrovich Hau’s ‘Empress Alexandra Feodorovna’s Sitting Room, Cottage Palace, St. Petersburg, Russia’
HomeAdvisor

The Reason Why Wine Bottles Have Dents in the Bottom

ForsterForest, iStock via Getty Images
ForsterForest, iStock via Getty Images

A lot of what you think you know about wine may actually be a myth, and that includes the purpose of the dent in the bottom of a bottle. While it served an important function centuries ago, the design feature today is cosmetic at best—and deceitful at worst.

According to Wine Spectator, the dimple raising up the floor of your wine bottle is actually called a punt. Prior to the Industrial Revolution, all wine bottles were handmade by glassblowers, and these punts were added to ensure they could stand upright. Today, most wine bottles are made by machines, and it would be easier to manufacture them with even bottoms that lay flat than it was 200 years ago. But because of tradition, the punt has endured.

The wine industry has found alternate uses for the archaic dent over the years. It creates a natural place to hold a wine bottle, and when pouring a glass, the proper technique is to rest your thumb in the bottle's indent. The punt can also be exploited to trick customers into thinking they're getting more than what they paid for. Two wine bottles stored next to each other on a shelf may appear to be the same size, but if one has a deeper dent, it actually contains less liquid.

The depth of a bottle's punt also used to be a marker of value, and some wine manufacturers continue to exaggerate the indents at the bottom of the glass to pass it off as high-quality. But as is the case with the heft or the color of your wine bottle, these cosmetic features have nothing to do with the caliber of the product inside.

The wine world feels a lot less intimidating when you realize a lot of its conventions are meaningless, like the rules that reds must be served with meat or that corks are better than twist caps. Here are some more wine myths to look out for.

[h/t Wine Spectator]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER