25 Non-Christmas Things That Have Happened on December 25

George Caleb Bingham, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons
George Caleb Bingham, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Over the years, lots of amazing things have happened on December 25. The birth of Jesus Christ, however, was not one of them. J.C.'s arrival—the precise timing of which remains unknown—wasn’t pegged to 12/25 until 336 CE. While it’s certainly come to dominate its calendar square, Christmas isn’t the only reason to celebrate the date. What follows are 25 other incidents and milestones that make December 25 a day worth commemorating with silly songs and colored lights.

1. 597 // The Julian Calendar reintroduced to England

Originally taking effect in 45 BCE and traditionally considered reintroduced to England in 597, it took a little over 200 years for England to fully commit to Julius Caesar's preferred means of measuring time (and they were nearly another 200 years behind the rest of Europe in switching over to the Gregorian calendar in the 1750s). At least Caesar’s hairstyle, on the other hand, never goes out of style.

2. 800 // Charlemagne crowned Holy Roman emperor

Vassil, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

In his role, the man also known as Charles the Great and "the father of Europe" helped to foster the Carolingian Renaissance—a glorious explosion of culture and intellect nobody has ever heard of.

3. 1492 // Christopher Columbus's Santa Maria sinks on Hispanola

Ol’ Chris turned lemons to lemonade, using timber from the ship to build a fort near the modern Haitian town of Limonade.

4. 1741 // Astronomer Anders Celsius introduces the Centigrade scale

Some 270 years later, Americans still don’t know what the hell those numbers mean.

5. 1758 // Return of Halley's Comet first sighted

German farmer and amateur astronomer Johann Georg Palitzsch spotted the fireball, confirming Edmond Halley’s theory of 76-year cycles. Before that, everyone had figured it was driven by willy-nilly by demons or elves or something.

6. 1776 // George Washington crosses the Delaware River and defeats 1400 Hessians

He kept telling his men what a righteous painting it would make one day.

7. 1809 // Physician Ephraim McDowell performs the first abdominal surgery in the U.S.

He removed a 22 pound ovarian tumor, but the hardest part was probably getting insurance approval.

8. 1843 // First-ever theater matinee presented at The Olympic in New York City

This would’ve been a good day to get on the waitlist for Hamilton tickets.

9. 1868 // President Andrew Johnson grants unconditional pardon to Confederate veterans of the Civil War

And then, a few days later, he celebrated his 60th birthday by throwing a party for 300 of his grandchildren's closest friends.

10. 1873 // Thomas Edison marries his first wife

Mary Stillwell was just 16 when she wed the inventor, who apparently neglected his family in favor of his work. Unless you live in a house without light bulbs, don’t judge.

11. 1896 // John Philip Sousa composes "Stars and Stripes Forever"

The magnum opus of the "March King" was declared the official march of the United States in 1987.

12. 1930 // The Mt. Van Hoevenberg Bobsled Run at Lake Placid, New York opens to the public

America’s first bobsled track built to international standards is on the National Register of Historic Places. Sadly, the gift shop doesn’t sell "I’m a Luger, Baby" T-shirts.

13. 1931 // The Metropolitan Opera broadcasts its first full opera over the radio

The show was Engelbert Humperdinck's Hänsel und Gretel, and a critic/color commentator talked through most of it.

14. 1946 // Jimmy Buffett was born in Pascagoula, Mississippi

He was promptly swaddled in Hawaiian shirts, baptized in tequila, and worshipped by future yuppies in the nursery.

15. 1959 // Ringo Starr gets his first drum kit

Getty Images

If Pete Best ever gets a time machine, he’s making sure Richard Starkey gets a tuba instead.

16. 1962 // The film version of To Kill a Mockingbird is released

The trial portion of the film takes up twice as much time as in the book because star Gregory Peck demanded more screen time.

17. 1967 // Paul McCartney and Jane Asher announce their engagement

The pair never wed, but Asher can say she inspired such Beatles classics as "And I Love Her" and "Here, There and Everywhere." Plus, she avoided being in Wings.

18. 1968 // Apollo 8 finished its successful moon orbit

Nothing terrible happened, which is why you’ve never seen a movie about it.

19. 1977 // Charlie Chaplin dies

Topical Press Agency/Getty Images

Thanks to his iconic "Tramp" character, the silent film star remains a hero to well-meaning bumblers with funny mustaches.

20. 1985 // Longest-ever battery-powered car trip ends

Two blokes in a Freight Rover Leyland Sherpa drove Great Britain from bottom (Land’s End) to top (John o' Groat's, Scotland) in four days, likely singing Wham! all the way.

21. 1989 // Scientists in Japan achieve -271.8° C, the coldest temperature ever recorded

This was a full 10 degrees colder than a brass toilet seat in the Yukon.

22. 1991 // Gorbachev resigns as president of the USSR

World History Archive, Alamy

Six years later, he starred in a Pizza Hut commercial.

23. 1997 // Jerry Seinfeld announces his namesake sitcom will end in the spring

Seinfeld

taught us we’re all terrible people living meaningless lives. We miss it still.

24. 2002 // Katie Hnida becomes the first woman to play in a Division I college football game

The New Mexico University placekicker attempted an extra point against UCLA in the Las Vegas Bowl, but it was blocked. There’s probably a metaphor in there somewhere.

25. 2006 // James Brown dies

The "hardest working man in showbiz" finally got a break.

10 Rad Gifts for Hikers

Greg Rosenke/Unsplash
Greg Rosenke/Unsplash

The popularity of bird-watching, camping, and hiking has skyrocketed this year. Whether your gift recipients are weekend warriors or seasoned dirtbags, they'll appreciate these tools and gear for getting most out of their hiking experience.

1. Stanley Nesting Two-Cup Cookset; $14

Amazon

Stanley’s compact and lightweight cookset includes a 20-ounce stainless steel pot with a locking handle, a vented lid, and two insulated 10-ounce tumblers. It’s the perfect size for brewing hot coffee, rehydrating soup, or boiling water while out on the trail with a buddy. And as some hardcore backpackers note in their Amazon reviews, your favorite hiker can take the tumblers out and stuff the pot with a camp stove, matches, and other necessities to make good use of space in their pack.

Buy it: Amazon

2. Osprey Sirrus and Stratos 24-Liter Hiking Packs; $140

Amazon

Osprey’s packs are designed with trail-tested details to maximize comfort and ease of use. The Sirrus pack (pictured) is sized for women, while the Stratos fits men’s proportions. Both include an internal sleeve for a hydration reservoir, exterior mesh and hipbelt pockets, an attachment for carrying trekking poles, and a built-in rain cover.

Buy them: Amazon, Amazon

3. Yeti Rambler 18-Ounce Bottle; $48

Amazon

Nothing beats ice-cold water after a summer hike or a sip of hot tea during a winter walk. The Yeti Rambler can serve up both: Beverages can stay hot or cold for hours thanks to its insulated construction, and its steel body (in a variety of colors) is basically indestructible. It will add weight to your hiker's pack, though—for a lighter-weight, non-insulated option, the tried-and-true Camelbak Chute water bottle is incredibly sturdy and leakproof.

Buy it: Amazon

4. Mappinners Greatest 100 Hikes of the National Parks Scratch-Off Poster; $30

Amazon

The perfect gift for park baggers in your life (or yourself), this 16-inch-by-20-inch poster features epic hikes like Angel’s Landing in Zion National Park and Half Dome in Yosemite National Park. Once the hike is complete, you can scratch off the gold foil to reveal an illustration of the park.

Buy it: Amazon

5. National Geographic Adventure Edition Road Atlas; $19

Amazon

Hikers can use this brand-new, updated road atlas to plan their next adventure. In addition to comprehensive maps of all 50 states, Puerto Rico, Canada, and Mexico, they'll get National Geographic’s top 100 outdoor destinations, useful details about the most popular national parks, and points on the maps noting off-the-beaten-path places to explore.  

Buy it: Amazon

6. Adventure Medical Kits Hiker First-Aid Kit; $25

Amazon

This handy 67-piece kit is stuffed with all the things you hope your hiker will never need in the wilderness. Not only does it contain supplies for pain, cuts and scrapes, burns, and blisters (every hiker’s nemesis!), the items are organized clearly in the bag to make it easy to find tweezers or an alcohol wipe in an emergency.

Buy it: Amazon

7. Hiker Hunger Ultralight Trekking Poles; $70

Amazon

Trekking poles will help increase your hiker's balance and stability and reduce strain on their lower body by distributing it to their arms and shoulders. This pair is made of carbon fiber, a super-strong and lightweight material. From the sweat-absorbing cork handles to the selection of pole tips for different terrain, these poles answer every need on the trail. 

Buy it: Amazon

8. Leatherman Signal Camping Multitool; $120

Amazon

What can’t this multitool do? This gadget contains 19 hiking-friendly tools in a 4.5-inch package, including pliers, screwdrivers, bottle opener, saw, knife, hammer, wire cutter, and even an emergency whistle.

Buy it: Amazon

9. RAVPower Power Bank; $24

Amazon

Don’t let your hiker get caught off the grid with a dead phone. They can charge RAVPower’s compact power bank before they head out on the trail, and then use it to quickly juice up a phone or tablet when the batteries get low. Its 3-inch-by-5-inch profile won’t take up much room in a pack or purse.

Buy it: Amazon

10. Pack of Four Indestructible Field Books; $14

Amazon

Neither rain, nor snow, nor hail will be a match for these waterproof, tearproof 3.5-inch-by-5.5-inch notebooks. Your hiker can stick one in their pocket along with a regular pen or pencil to record details of their hike or brainstorm their next viral Tweet.

Buy it: Amazon

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See What Each State Is Googling This Halloween Season

Different states have different interests when it comes to Halloween.
Different states have different interests when it comes to Halloween.
Photo by Daisy Anderson from Pexels

Halloween may look a little—or a lot—different this year owing to ongoing global health concerns brought on by COVID-19, but that hasn’t stopped people from pursuing interests from costumes to movies related to the spooky season.

Using Google Trends data, the people at SatelliteInternet.com, which helps connect people in rural areas to reliable internet access, have compiled a map of the Halloween topics each state has been searching for this year. As you can see, pumpkins, candy, and horror films are still very much on the minds of people looking for some Halloween inspiration.

A map of common Halloween Google search terms according to state.SatelliteInternet.com

While searches for autumn dominated in 14 states, Vermont natives have been curious about Stephen King’s It, while Kansas and South Dakota were searching for Chucky from the Child’s Play franchise.

Oregon wants to keep it light, searching for the 1998 Disney Channel movie Halloweentown, while Delaware is interested in body painting. Maine seems to be preoccupied with keeping kids busy, which is why coloring books are at the top of their search list.

If you’re curious which costumes are trending nationally, Google recently released a list. Witches take the top spot, followed by dinosaurs, Harley Quinn, and rabbits.