Postbiotics May Prevent Diabetes in Obesity

You’ve likely heard about probiotics—live bacteria with long, colorful names found in your yogurt that help generate a happy gut. You may have even heard of prebiotics, which are compounds that have a beneficial effect on the bacteria in your body. But you’re probably less familiar with postbiotics—factors derived from bacteria that can also have a positive impact on our health.

Researchers at McMaster University who study diabetes and obesity have discovered a postbiotic factor called MDP that prevents pre-diabetic obese mice from developing diabetes. Their surprising results were recently published in Cell Metabolism.

When bacteria in the gut become chronically out of balance—known as intestinal dysbiosis [PDF]—a person can become insulin resistant, or prediabetic. Dysbiosis is often found in people with obesity. “Key markers on the road to diabetes are insulin sensitivity and insulin resistance—how well that hormone can lower blood glucose,” Jon Schertzer, lead study author and assistant professor of biochemistry at McMaster University tells Mental Floss. Insulin’s job is to bring your blood glucose back up to normal after you eat or drink something. If you’re insulin resistant, or improperly sensitive, insulin can’t do its job properly. “What a postbiotic does is allow the insulin to do a better job,” he says.

Schertzer’s team sought to investigate whether postbiotics could have an impact on obesity before a person becomes overtly diabetic. “The focus of this study is prediabetes—the stage before the overt disease has developed and it’s still reversible. Obesity is the biggest risk factor for prediabetes,” he explains.

The team found that a postbiotic called muramyl dipeptide (MDP), derived from a bacterial cell wall, was able to reduce insulin resistance in mouse models—regardless of weight loss or changes in the intestinal microbiome during obesity.

To test this, Schertzer separated mice into two groups. One group was given MDP at the same time as they were fed a high-fat diet intended to cause obesity. In that experiment, the mice were given MDP four days per week for five weeks. The MDP injections improved insulin and glucose tolerance after five weeks—remarkably, without altering body mass or fatty tissue levels.

In the second group, the team fed the mice into a state of obesity over 10 weeks, putting them into a state of prediabetes. Then they injected MDP into the mice three times over three days and saw a rapid improvement in blood glucose by the third day. “It’s not that the injection itself is lowering blood glucose, but those three short duration injections set the program up to allow insulin to work better,” he says.

When the body senses MDP is present, it increases the amount of a protein in fat tissue, called IR4, which sends out signals that lower blood glucose. “We don’t fully understand how it signals the body to lower blood glucose,” he admits. “We do know it reduces inflammation.”

While that may not sound dramatic, he says they were quite surprised, given that the typical immune response is to increase inflammation. “The postbiotic actually reduced inflammation in fat tissue, which are the tissues that control blood glucose,” he says.

While the results are exciting, he’s quick to point out that “we’re interested in discovery. We’ll leave the clinical aspect to clinicians.” They’d like to achieve a version of MDP that could be taken orally and not injected, but more research will be required. Plus, postbiotics can be a finicky area of research. He describes testing a different postbiotic that's a “a close cousin" to MDP, being "a different type of cell wall that was different by only one peptide.” But that postbiotic made glucose tolerance and inflammation much worse.

However, they also tested what’s called an “orphan drug”—approved only for clinical trials but not likely to make the drug company any money—called mifamurtide, typically used in treating bone cancers. Mifamurtide is synthetic, but chemically identical to the MDP postbiotic. It, too, improved blood glucose and insulin tolerance when administered to mice. The promising part about it is that since the drug is already given to humans in clinical trials, “it could make the transition to humans far more rapid,” he says.

One of their next steps is to expand the models they’re using, starting with age-induced diabetes. “Obesity is only one factor that promotes diabetes,” he says.

The most pressing question now, he says, is “to understand what is actually happening in the gut during obesity.” This compound promises a future in which obesity would pose less of a risk factor for diabetes. And postbiotics hold a lot of potential for future research.

“Postbiotics are a new source of drugs. Bacteria have different physiology from us, and can make all kinds of things that we can’t make,” Schertzer says.

Amazon's Under-the-Radar Coupon Page Features Deals on Home Goods, Electronics, and Groceries

Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Now that Prime Day is over, and with Black Friday and Cyber Monday still a few weeks away, online deals may seem harder to come by. And while it can be a hassle to scour the internet for promo codes, buy-one-get-one deals, and flash sales, Amazon actually has an extensive coupon page you might not know about that features deals to look through every day.

As pointed out by People, the coupon page breaks deals down by categories, like electronics, home & kitchen, and groceries (the coupons even work with SNAP benefits). Since most of the deals revolve around the essentials, it's easy to stock up on items like Cottonelle toilet paper, Tide Pods, Cascade dishwasher detergent, and a 50 pack of surgical masks whenever you're running low.

But the low prices don't just stop at necessities. If you’re looking for the best deal on headphones, all you have to do is go to the electronics coupon page and it will bring up a deal on these COWIN E7 PRO noise-canceling headphones, which are now $80, thanks to a $10 coupon you could have missed.

Alternatively, if you are looking for deals on specific brands, you can search for their coupons from the page. So if you've had your eye on the Homall S-Racer gaming chair, you’ll find there's currently a coupon that saves you 5 percent, thanks to a simple search.

To discover all the deals you have been missing out on, head over to the Amazon Coupons page.

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Late MythBusters Star Grant Imahara Honored With New STEAM Foundation

Grant Imahara attends San Diego Comic-Con
Grant Imahara attends San Diego Comic-Con
Genevieve via Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Fans of MythBusters and White Rabbit Project host Grant Imahara were saddened to hear of his passing due to a brain aneurysm in July 2020 at the age of 49. Imahara, a graduate of the University of Southern California, used the television medium to share his love of science and engineering. Now, his passion for education will continue via an educational foundation developed in his name.

The Grant Imahara STEAM Foundation was announced Thursday, October 23, 2020 by family and friends on what would have been Imahara’s 50th birthday. The Foundation will provide mentorships, grants, and scholarships that will allow students from diverse backgrounds access to STEAM education, which places an emphasis on science, technology, engineering, arts, and math. (Formerly referred to as STEM, the “A” for art was added more recently.)

Imahara had a history of aiding students. While working at Industrial Light and Magic in the early 2000s, he mentored the robotics team at Richmond High School to prepare for the international FIRST Robotics Competition. Whether he was working on television or behind-the-scenes on movies like the Star Wars prequels and The Matrix sequels, Imahara always found time to promote and encourage young engineering talent.

The Grant Imahara STEAM Foundation’s founding board members include Imahara’s mother, Carolyn Imahara, and close friends Don Bies, Anna Bies, Edward Chin, Fon H. Davis, Coya Elliott, and Ioanna Stergiades.

“There are many students, like my son Grant, who need the balance of the technical and the creative, and this is what STEAM is all about,” Carolyn Imahara said in a statement. “I’m so proud of my son’s career, but I’m equally proud of the work he did mentoring students. He would be thrilled that we plan to continue this, plus much more, through The Grant Imahara STEAM Foundation.”

Imahara friend Wade Bick is also launching an effort in concert with the USC Viterbi School of Engineering to name a study lounge after Imahara. Donations can be made here.

You can find out more about the foundation, and make a donation, on its website.