Postbiotics May Prevent Diabetes in Obesity

You’ve likely heard about probiotics—live bacteria with long, colorful names found in your yogurt that help generate a happy gut. You may have even heard of prebiotics, which are compounds that have a beneficial effect on the bacteria in your body. But you’re probably less familiar with postbiotics—factors derived from bacteria that can also have a positive impact on our health.

Researchers at McMaster University who study diabetes and obesity have discovered a postbiotic factor called MDP that prevents pre-diabetic obese mice from developing diabetes. Their surprising results were recently published in Cell Metabolism.

When bacteria in the gut become chronically out of balance—known as intestinal dysbiosis [PDF]—a person can become insulin resistant, or prediabetic. Dysbiosis is often found in people with obesity. “Key markers on the road to diabetes are insulin sensitivity and insulin resistance—how well that hormone can lower blood glucose,” Jon Schertzer, lead study author and assistant professor of biochemistry at McMaster University tells Mental Floss. Insulin’s job is to bring your blood glucose back up to normal after you eat or drink something. If you’re insulin resistant, or improperly sensitive, insulin can’t do its job properly. “What a postbiotic does is allow the insulin to do a better job,” he says.

Schertzer’s team sought to investigate whether postbiotics could have an impact on obesity before a person becomes overtly diabetic. “The focus of this study is prediabetes—the stage before the overt disease has developed and it’s still reversible. Obesity is the biggest risk factor for prediabetes,” he explains.

The team found that a postbiotic called muramyl dipeptide (MDP), derived from a bacterial cell wall, was able to reduce insulin resistance in mouse models—regardless of weight loss or changes in the intestinal microbiome during obesity.

To test this, Schertzer separated mice into two groups. One group was given MDP at the same time as they were fed a high-fat diet intended to cause obesity. In that experiment, the mice were given MDP four days per week for five weeks. The MDP injections improved insulin and glucose tolerance after five weeks—remarkably, without altering body mass or fatty tissue levels.

In the second group, the team fed the mice into a state of obesity over 10 weeks, putting them into a state of prediabetes. Then they injected MDP into the mice three times over three days and saw a rapid improvement in blood glucose by the third day. “It’s not that the injection itself is lowering blood glucose, but those three short duration injections set the program up to allow insulin to work better,” he says.

When the body senses MDP is present, it increases the amount of a protein in fat tissue, called IR4, which sends out signals that lower blood glucose. “We don’t fully understand how it signals the body to lower blood glucose,” he admits. “We do know it reduces inflammation.”

While that may not sound dramatic, he says they were quite surprised, given that the typical immune response is to increase inflammation. “The postbiotic actually reduced inflammation in fat tissue, which are the tissues that control blood glucose,” he says.

While the results are exciting, he’s quick to point out that “we’re interested in discovery. We’ll leave the clinical aspect to clinicians.” They’d like to achieve a version of MDP that could be taken orally and not injected, but more research will be required. Plus, postbiotics can be a finicky area of research. He describes testing a different postbiotic that's a “a close cousin" to MDP, being "a different type of cell wall that was different by only one peptide.” But that postbiotic made glucose tolerance and inflammation much worse.

However, they also tested what’s called an “orphan drug”—approved only for clinical trials but not likely to make the drug company any money—called mifamurtide, typically used in treating bone cancers. Mifamurtide is synthetic, but chemically identical to the MDP postbiotic. It, too, improved blood glucose and insulin tolerance when administered to mice. The promising part about it is that since the drug is already given to humans in clinical trials, “it could make the transition to humans far more rapid,” he says.

One of their next steps is to expand the models they’re using, starting with age-induced diabetes. “Obesity is only one factor that promotes diabetes,” he says.

The most pressing question now, he says, is “to understand what is actually happening in the gut during obesity.” This compound promises a future in which obesity would pose less of a risk factor for diabetes. And postbiotics hold a lot of potential for future research.

“Postbiotics are a new source of drugs. Bacteria have different physiology from us, and can make all kinds of things that we can’t make,” Schertzer says.

10 Citizen Science Projects That Need Your Help

A citizen scientist takes a photo of scarlet mushrooms.
A citizen scientist takes a photo of scarlet mushrooms.
lovelypeace/iStock via Getty Images

Channel your inner Nikola Tesla or Marie Curie by participating in actual scientific research, either out and about or without even leaving your couch. These projects unleash the power of the public to be places that researchers can’t be and to spread the workload when data start piling up. They really can’t do it without you.

1. Catalog photos of Earth's cities at night.

Photo from space of a city at night
Identify cities from the photos taken from the International Space Station.
Chris Hadfield, NASA // Public Domain

Cities at Night—a study by Complutense University of Madrid—asks people to catalog images of the Earth at night taken from the International Space Station, part of the millions of images in the Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth database. The current project, Lost at Night, needs people to identify cities within images of 310-mile circles on Earth. Hundreds of volunteers have classified thousands of images already, but classification by multiple individuals ensures greater accuracy. In fact, the project will determine the optimum number of people needed. The primary goal is an open atlas of publicly available nighttime images. Just log on to the image database to help.

2. Follow fish using high-tech tags.

You’ll have to go fishing—an outdoor activity you can do by yourself!—for this assignment. Volunteer to tag fish for the American Littoral Society, whose citizen scientists have tagged more than 640,000 fish since the program began in 1965. You can tag the fish you catch and release, or report tagged fish to the organization. The data is sent to the National Marine Fisheries Service Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, where it helps scientists track the populations and movements of coastal species like striped bass, flounder, and bluefish. To get started, become a member of the American Littoral Society, which comes with a packet of tagging gear and instructions.

3. Spy on penguins in Antarctica.

Penguins on an ice floe
Keeping tabs on penguins is one way a citizen scientist can lend a hand.
axily/iStock via Getty Images

Here's another project for those stuck indoors. Penguins are threatened by climate change, fisheries, and direct human disturbance, yet scientists have little data on the birds. To fill in the gaps, 50 cameras throughout the Southern Ocean and Antarctic Peninsula take images of colonies of gentoo, chinstrap, Adélie, and king penguins year-round. You can help the University of Oxford-based research team by sorting through thousands of images to identify and mark individual adult penguins, chicks, and eggs. You'll be pinpointing seasonal and geographic variations in populations that may represent changes to the Antarctic ecosystem. Marking other animals in the images helps researchers figure out which ones are hanging around penguin colonies. Discuss a specific image or the project with the science team and other volunteers in an online forum.

4. Battle an invasive marine species.

Like to dive or snorkel? Make it count by reporting lionfish sightings or captures to the Reef Environmental Education Foundation's Volunteer Reef Survey Project. Lionfish, which are native to the Indo-Pacific, were first sighted in the South Atlantic in 1985 and were likely released by private aquarium owners. Since then, they have spread throughout the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico and caused native fish populations to decline by up to 80 percent. Scientists say this invasion may be one of the century’s greatest threats to warm temperate and tropical Atlantic reefs. You can also join a lionfish derby to catch and kill some of the tasty fish so scientists can analyze their biology.

5. Count birds from your backyard.

Bluebirds at a bird feeder
Bluebirds dine on mealworms at a bird feeder.
MelodyanneM/iStock via Getty Images

North American birds are in trouble. Recent studies predict dramatic declines in the populations of migratory birds due to climate change—and much of the data that went into these studies came from citizen scientists who monitored species without leaving home. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Birds Canada launches Project FeederWatch in the winter months; you simply put out a bird feeder and report the number and species of birds that visit it. Citizen scientists can also join the Cornell Lab's NestWatch—you find a nest, monitor it every three or four days, and report your data. And every February, the Audubon Society runs the Great Backyard Bird Count, in which participants submit data to produce a real-time snapshot of bird populations across North America. Any time of the year, birdwatchers can submit lists of the birds they see on eBird, a huge database of sightings that informs public policy, conservation efforts, and other initiatives.

6. Photograph plants for climate change research.

The Appalachian Mountain Club's Mountain Watch program asks hikers to document alpine and forest plants for ecological research. By taking photos of flowers and fruiting plants along woodland trails and uploading them to the iNaturalist app, participants provide data about the times and places that plants bloom. Scientists then compile the information in an online database and analyze it for trends that could indicate changing climates.

7. Comb through ships' logbooks for weather data.

Old handwritten letters
Practice your handwriting-deciphering skills on the Old Weather project.
scisettialfio/iStock via Getty Images

Ships’ logs from mid-19th century American sailing vessels contain detailed weather observations. Citizen scientists can help transcribe observations from whaling vessels for the Old Weather project; scientists will use the information to learn more about past environmental conditions and create better climate models for future projections. Historians will also use the data to track past ship movements and tell the stories of the people on board.

8. Make American history documents and science notes accessible to more people.

The Smithsonian Libraries are stuffed with original history and science documents that have lain in drawers for decades. Help open up "America's attic" to the public by organizing and transcribing digital versions of handwritten field notebooks, diaries, logbooks, specimen labels, photo albums, and other materials. You'll join thousands of other volunteers to investigate documents like the Sally K. Ride Papers, the collection of the Freedmen's Bureau (which helped former slaves following the Civil War), and field studies of insects by the Irish naturalist Arthur Stelfox.

9. Investigate historical crimes in Australia.

Drawing of a convict ship to Australia
A drawing of a 19th-century convict ship destined for Australia.
Photos.com/iStock via Getty Images

If you're obsessed with true crime, you'll love this project. Volunteer to investigate and transcribe criminal records from 19th- and 20th-century Australia, which was founded as a British penal colony. Alana Piper, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Australian Centre for Public History at the University of Technology Sydney, will use the transcriptions to construct the "life histories and offending patterns of Australian criminals" from the 1850s to the 1940s. More than 40,000 subjects have been completed so far.

10. Map the unique features of Mars's South Pole.

Travel to Mars—without the hassle of zero gravity or space-vegetable farming—through Planet Four, a citizen science project that is currently tasked with identifying features on Mars's dynamic South Pole. Volunteers examine photos from the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconaissance Orbiter and pick out "fans" or "blotches" in the landscape of seasonal carbon dioxide ice. Scientists believe these structures indicate wind speed and direction on the Martian surface and offers clues about the evolution of the Red Planet's climate.

Why Cats Like to Shove Their Butts in Your Face, According to an Animal Behavior Expert

This cat might be happier showing off its butt.
This cat might be happier showing off its butt.
Okssi68/iStock via Getty Images

Cats are full of eccentric behaviors. They hate getting wet. Their tongues sometimes get stuck midway out of their mouths, known as a “blep.” And they’re really happy hanging out in bodegas.

Some of these traits can be explained while others are more mysterious. Case in point: when they stick their rear end in your face for no apparent reason.

Are cats doing this just to humiliate their hapless caregivers? What would possess a cat to greet a person with its butt? Why subject the person who gives you food and shelter to such degradation?

To find out, Inverse spoke with Mikel Delgado, a postdoctoral fellow at the School of Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis. According to Delgado, cats don’t necessarily perceive their rectal flaunting as anything aggressive or domineering. In fact, it might be a cat’s way of saying hello.

“For cats, it’s normal for them to sniff each other’s butts as a way to say hello or confirm another cat’s identity,” Delgado said. “It’s hard for us to relate to, but for them, smell is much more important to cats and how they recognize each other than vision is. So cats may be ‘inviting’ us to check them out, or just giving us a friendly hello.”

For a cat, presenting or inspecting a butt is a kind of fingerprint scan. It’s a biological measure of security.

Other experts agree with this assessment, explaining that cats use their rear end to express friendliness or affection. Raising their tail so you can take a whiff is a sign of trust. If they keep their tail down, it’s possible they might be feeling a little shy.

If you think this situation is eased by the fact you rarely hear cats fart, we have bad news. They do. Because they don’t often gulp air while eating, they just don’t have enough air in their digestive tract to make an audible noise. Rest assured that, statistically speaking, there will be times a cat giving you a friendly greeting is also stealthily farting in your face.

[h/t Inverse]

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