How to Download Thousands of Classic Books and Movies That Just Entered the Public Domain

iStock.com/hocus-focus
iStock.com/hocus-focus

You may want to check the amount of available storage space on your e-reader, because classic books by Lewis Carroll, Agatha Christie, Aldous Huxley, D.H. Lawrence, and Virginia Woolf are now in the public domain. As Motherboard reports, the copyright on tens of thousands of books from 1923 expired on January 1, which means that these titles are now in the public domain and can be legally downloaded for free.

Because the copyright on works published between 1923 and 1977 is good for 95 years, this marks the first time in decades that a large number of books, movies, and songs has entered the public domain. Next year, items from 1924 will be available for download, and so on.

The list of titles up for grabs includes Jacob’s Room by Virginia Woolf, The Murder on the Links by Agatha Christie, The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran, The World Crisis by Winston Churchill, Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas, and many more.

Duke’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain has painstakingly listed nearly all of the new public domain works in an Excel spreadsheet, and a condensed list of the top titles is also available on its website. Unfortunately, you can’t get them all in one place, but a few reliable sources probably have what you’re looking for.

Project Gutenberg, HathiTrust, and the Internet Archive are a few of the digital libraries that let you download or read books online for free. You can also check the selections available on Read Print and The Literature Network. If those options fail, try searching for a specific title on Google Books.

A few noteworthy movies also recently entered the public domain. Some of them include Cecil B. DeMille’s The Ten Commandments and Charlie Chaplin's The Pilgrim. This essentially means these films can now be shown in theaters or public screenings without fear of violating copyright laws. Some of them are also available for viewing or download on the Internet Moving Image Archive.

[h/t Motherboard]

This Innovative Cutting Board Takes the Mess Out of Meal Prep

There's no way any of these ingredients will end up on the floor.
There's no way any of these ingredients will end up on the floor.
TidyBoard, Kickstarter

Transferring food from the cutting board to the bowl—or scraps to the compost bin—can get a little messy, especially if you’re dealing with something that has a tendency to roll off the board, spill juice everywhere, or both (looking at you, cherry tomatoes).

The TidyBoard, available on Kickstarter, is a cutting board with attached containers that you can sweep your ingredients right into, taking the mess out of meal prep and saving you some counter space in the process. The board itself is 15 inches by 20 inches, and the container that fits in its empty slot is 14 inches long, 5.75 inches wide, and more than 4 inches deep. Two smaller containers fit inside the large one, making it easy to separate your ingredients.

Though the 4-pound board hangs off the edge of your counter, good old-fashioned physics will keep it from tipping off—as long as whatever you’re piling into the containers doesn’t exceed 9 pounds. It also comes with a second set of containers that work as strainers, so you can position the TidyBoard over the edge of your sink and drain excess water or juice from your ingredients as you go.

You can store food in the smaller containers, which have matching lids; and since they’re all made of BPA-free silicone, feel free to pop them in the microwave. (Remove the small stopper on top of the lid first for a built-in steaming hole.)

tidyboard storage containers
They also come in gray, if teal isn't your thing.
TidyBoard

Not only does the bamboo-made TidyBoard repel bacteria, it also won’t dull your knives or let strong odors seep into it. In short, it’s an opportunity to make cutting, cleaning, storing, and eating all easier, neater, and more efficient. Prices start at $79, and it’s expected to ship by October 2020—you can find out more details and order yours on Kickstarter.

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The EatOkra App Makes It Easy to Find—and Support—Black-Owned Restaurants in Your Neighborhood

Daria Shevtsova, Pexels
Daria Shevtsova, Pexels

The recent movement for racial justice has inspired a number of changes in American life. One new development is in how some people are spending their money. In the month following George Floyd's death while in police custody, Yelp searches for Black-owned businesses skyrocketed by 1785 percent. As Kristen Adaway reports for Thrillist, an app called EatOkra makes it easy to turn supporting Black-owned businesses into a lifelong habit.

Anthony Edwards Jr. and Janique Bradley, now husband and wife, launched EatOkra in 2016. The app started as a directory of Black-owned restaurants in Brooklyn, and today it lists businesses under Black ownership in Chicago, Los Angeles, and other cities across the U.S.

Instead of using Seamless or Grubhub, users can search EatOkra for restaurants by location and cuisine. The restaurant pages that show up list information like phone number, address, hours, and user reviews. If the business offers delivery, there may even be links for diners to place online orders through outside apps.

"Gathering and food play a key role in defining our sense of community, and EatOkra provides users with a tool that gives them an opportunity to locate these communities and support them in some way," EatOkra's website reads. "Nothing embodies this idea of community more than the act of feeding someone or coming together to eat or be fed."

Since rolling out four years ago, EatOkra has amassed more than 150,000 users. You can start connecting to the 2600 Black-owned businesses in its directory by downloading the app for free today.

[h/t Thrillist]