Do You Remember These 15 Discontinued Girl Scout Cookies?

Chloe Effron for mental_floss
Chloe Effron for mental_floss

It’s been over 100 years since the Girl Scouts sold their first cookies—which the troopers and their moms made from scratch in their kitchens and wrapped in wax paper—for 25 to 35 cents per dozen. And since then, the Girl Scouts have built a veritable cookie empire, populated with an assortment of delectable cookie varieties. Thin Mints, Samoas, Tagalongs, and Do-si-dos (to name a few) are a far cry from the simple vanilla shortbread cookies sold in the 1920s.

Unfortunately for some cookies, in with the new means out with the old. Through the years, we've also had to bid adieu to a long line of good cookies, including the Dulce de Leche and Thank You Berry Munch. Here are 15 Girl Scout Cookie varieties that live on only in our memories (and dreams—I’m lookin’ at you, Juliettes).

1. VAN'CHOS

Available from 1974 to 1983, these chocolate and vanilla sandwich cookies—which came in an assorted box—were a throwback to Girl Scout Cookies’ early flavors. In the 1950s, only four types of cookies existed: the original shortbread, chocolate-filled cookie, vanilla-filled cookie, and the first iteration of the Thin Mint (then called Chocolate Mint).

2. KOOKABURRAS

Like the lovechild of a Rice Krispies treat and a Twix bar, the Kookaburras, fleetingly available in the early ‘80s, sounded like heaven. Rectangular cookies with crispy rice, caramel, and chocolate? Don’t mind if I do. One nostalgia-plagued baker concocted her own recipe for these delightful morsels.

3. GOLDEN YANGLES

Not really cookies at all, Golden Yangles (available in the 1980s and discontinued in 1992*) were cheddar cheese crackers. What can I say, the ‘80s were a weird time.

4. PRALINE ROYALES

In 1992, the Praline Royale—a soft vanilla cookie with praline filling, pecans, coconut, and chocolate drizzled on top—replaced the Golden Yangle. The packaging for both the Praline Royal and the Golden Yangle touted “Building Bridges: One of many Girl Scout experiences that helps girls create their own futures.”

5. GOLDEN NUT CLUSTERS

From 1991 to 1992, the Golden Nut Cluster—a pecan cookie covered in caramel—was found amongst the Girl Scout Cookies’ ranks.

6. JULIETTES

Named after Girl Scouts founder Juliette Low, the Juliette (available from 1984 to1985 and then resurrected from 1993 to 1996) was the Golden Nut Cluster 2.0. Also boasting caramel and pecans, this dreamy cookie was also covered in milk chocolate—like the Girl Scouts’ version of a chocolate turtle.

7. SNAPS

Available from 1993 to 1997, these iced oatmeal raisin cookies seemed straight from Grandma’s kitchen.

8. UPSIDE DOWNS

In 1999, the Girl Scouts took on Little Debbie with an oatmeal cookie sandwich of their own. But, unlike Little Debbie’s soft Oatmeal Creme Pies, Upside Downs were crunchy.

9. LE CHIPS

In the late ‘90s, the Girl Scouts introduced Le Chip, a chocolate-dipped, chocolate chip hazelnut cookie. Debuting before America got on the Nutella bandwagon, these cookies were short-lived.

10. ALOHA CHIPS

Around for a short time in the early 2000s, they were the gussied up version of everyone’s least favorite cafeteria cookie: white chocolate macadamia nut.

11. APPLE CINNAMONS

Available from 1997 to 2001, Apple Cinnamons were sugar cookies dusted with cinnamon sugar. The apple part? Their shape. In keeping with the diet trend du jour, they were reduced fat.

12. OLÉ OLÉS

Another reduced fat cookie from the early aughts, Olé Olés were powdered sugar cookies with pecans and coconut and were available from 2001 to 2003.

13. CINNA-SPINS

Hopping on the latest fitness fad, these crispy, cinnamon swirl cookies were sold in 100-calorie packs in 2008.

14. LEMON CHALET CREMES

The defining characteristic of these lemon sandwich cookies (with a touch of cinnamon-ginger) was the image of a Swiss Chalet imprinted on the front. The Chalet, which exists in real life, is the first World Center of WAGGGS, the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts.

15. MANGO CREMES

These “healthy” treats debuted in 2013. The crispy vanilla and coconut sandwich cookie was filled with “a tangy mango flavored crème enhanced with the nutrients found in fruits.” Made by a company called Nutrifusion, the filling was made from rehydrated apples, oranges, cranberries, pomegranate, limes, strawberries, and—wait for it—shiitake mushrooms (for Vitamin D).

Illustrations by Chloe Effron for mental_floss.

America’s 10 Most Hated Easter Candies

Peeps are all out of cluck when it comes to confectionery popularity contests.
Peeps are all out of cluck when it comes to confectionery popularity contests.
William Thomas Cain/Getty Images

Whether you celebrate Easter as a religious holiday or not, it’s an opportune time to welcome the sunny, flora-filled season of spring with a basket or two of your favorite candy. And when it comes to deciding which Easter-themed confections belong in that basket, people have pretty strong opinions.

This year, CandyStore.com surveyed more than 19,000 customers to find out which sugary treats are widely considered the worst. If you’re a traditionalist, this may come as a shock: Cadbury Creme Eggs, Peeps, and solid chocolate bunnies are the top three on the list, and generic jelly beans landed in the ninth spot. While Peeps have long been polarizing, it’s a little surprising that the other three classics have so few supporters. Based on some comments left by participants, it seems like people are just really particular about the distinctions between certain types of candy.

Generic jelly beans, for example, were deemed old and bland, but people adore gourmet jelly beans, which were the fifth most popular Easter candy. Similarly, people thought Cadbury Creme Eggs were messy and low-quality, while Cadbury Mini Eggs—which topped the list of best candies—were considered inexplicably delicious and even “addictive.” And many candy lovers prefer hollow chocolate bunnies to solid ones, which people explained were simply “too much.” One participant even likened solid bunnies to bricks.

candystore.com's worst easter candies
The pretty pastel shades of bunny corn don't seem to be fooling the large contingent of candy corn haters.
CandyStore.com

If there’s one undeniable takeaway from the list of worst candies, it’s that a large portion of the population isn’t keen on chewy marshmallow treats in general. The eighth spot went to Hot Tamales Peeps, and Brach’s Marshmallow Chicks & Rabbits—which one person christened “the zombie bunny catacomb statue candy”—sits at number six.

Take a look at the full list below, and read more enlightening (and entertaining) survey comments here.

  1. Cadbury Creme Eggs
  1. Peeps
  1. Solid chocolate bunnies
  1. Bunny Corn
  1. Marshmallow Chicks & Rabbits
  1. Chocolate crosses
  1. Twix Eggs
  1. Hot Tamales Peeps
  1. Generic jelly beans
  1. Fluffy Stuff Cotton Tails

[h/t CandyStore.com]

84-Year-Old Italian Nonna Is Live-Streaming Pasta-Making Classes From Her Home Outside Rome

beingbonny, iStock via Getty Images
beingbonny, iStock via Getty Images

If you're looking for an entertaining distraction and a way to feed yourself that doesn't involve going outside, sign up for a virtual cooking class. Since the COVID-19 pandemic forced people around the world into isolation, plenty of new remote learning options have appeared on the internet. But few of them feature an 84-year-old Italian nonna teaching you how to make pasta from scratch.

As Broadsheet reports, Nonna Nerina is now hosting pasta-making classes every weekend from her home outside Rome. Before Italy went into lockdown to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus, the home cooking instructor taught her students in person. By moving online, she's able to share her authentic family recipes with people around the world while keeping herself healthy.

Live classes are two hours long and take place during Saturday and Sunday. This weekend, Nonna Nerina is making fettuccine with tomato sauce and cannelloni, though you won't be able to tune in if you haven't signed up yet—the slots are booked up until at least mid-April. If you'd prefer to take your remote cooking lessons during the week, Nerina's granddaughter Chiara hosts pasta-making classes Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays.

Classes cost $50, and you can sign up for them now through the Nonna Nerina website. Here are more educational videos to check out while you're stuck inside.

[h/t Broadsheet]

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