35 Offbeat Holidays You Can Celebrate in March

shmac84/iStock via Getty Images
shmac84/iStock via Getty Images

If you're into cute animals, delicious food, alien abductions, and/or a lack of typos, March is the month for you. Here are 25 offbeat holidays that celebrate a wide variety of quirky passions.

1. March 1: National Pig Day

Adorable baby piglet looks right at the camera
iStock.com/HadelProductions

Sure they like to roll around in mud, but that's just a pig's clever way of keeping cool on a hot day. Pigs are fascinating creatures—and one of the most intelligent members of the animal kingdom. Spend the first day of the month paying tribute to oinkers around the world.

2. March 1: National Peanut Butter Lover's Day

If you love peanut butter, this is the day to proudly polish off your PB-based sandwich of choice. Reflect on all of the amazing qualities of peanut butter, from its delicious taste to its amazingly effective gum-removing capabilities. If that’s not enough, there’s even a year-round website for lovers of the legume-based spread.

3. March 1: Peace Corps Day

A volunteer army intended to combat the evils of Cold War communism with kindness, the Peace Corps took its first steps when President John F. Kennedy signed an executive order on this day in 1961. At the time he was only requesting a trial mission, but the Peace Corps has since become a worldwide humanitarian institution.

4. March 2: Fun Facts About Names Day

A stack of name tags
miflippo/iStock via Getty Images

And you don't even have to go very far to celebrate. Check out some of our many posts celebrating onomastics.

5. March 3: What If Cats and Dogs Had Opposable Thumbs Day

They would rule the world is what.

6. March 3: National Anthem Day

The lyrics of "The Star-Spangled Banner" superimposed on an old American flag.
Andrea Izzotti/iStock via Getty Images

By the dawn’s early light, we do believe the United States adopted “The Star-Spangled Banner” as its national anthem on this very day. Francis Scott Key wrote the famous words in his 1814 poem “Defence of Fort McHenry,” which would later be set to a popular British standard tune. Although recognized over time by various American institutions, the song did not become the official anthem until Congress passed a resolution making it so in 1931.

7. March 4: National Grammar Day

The people who care most about this holiday will also want to know that National Proofreading Day is just a few days later, on March 8.

8. March 5: Cinco de Marcho

A group of men toasting mugs of beer
iStock.com/taa22

Technically, Cinco de Marcho is a nearly two-week celebration that commences on March 5 and is followed by a rigorous, 12-day training regimen that allows observers of the holiday to prepare their livers for St. Patrick’s Day.

9. March 6: Middle Name Pride Day

Time to celebrate the names of those long-lost relatives, your mom's maiden name, or whatever middle name your parents decided to give you—embarrassing or otherwise.

10. March 7: Alexander Graham Bell Day

Alexander Graham Bell
Hulton Archive/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images

On March 7, 1876, 29-year-old American inventor Alexander Graham Bell received a patent for a little invention called "the telephone."

11. March 7: Genealogy Day

It's been a long winter, and March just wants to make sure you didn’t forget who you are.

12. March 8: National Proofreading Day

A hand holding a red pen and marking up a document
AndreyPopov/iStock via Getty Images

Sure, it may seem scary—but the red pen is your friend. As is giving that missive you’re about to send a second (and very careful) reading. A typo might not seem like a big deal … until it costs you $80 million (or some serious embarrassment.)

13. March 9: Panic Day

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy enthusiasts may struggle to fully embrace this holiday, but this March 9th event encourages you to indulge all of your deepest fears and let loose a rampage of unbridled hysteria. Observational practices may include—but are certainly not limited to—tearing out one’s hair, sobbing uncontrollably on the subway, running around the office in a flop sweat and screaming at the top of your lungs, or finally breaking ground on that underground bunker you’ve always dreamed of building.

14. March 9: Fill Our Staplers Day

Stephen Root in Office Space (1999).
Stephen Root in Office Space (1999).
20th Century Fox Home Entertainment

Founded by the Dull Men's Club, this holiday is intended to serve as a reminder to refill your stapler. But having an empty stapler is a good reminder to refill your stapler, too.

15. March 10: Organize Your Home Office Day

Why stop at refilling the stapler?

16. March 10: International Bagpipe Day

Traditional scottish bagpiper at Dunnottar Castle
Lukassek/iStock via Getty Images

There are more than 130 different kinds of bagpipes played worldwide, and this is an international holiday to celebrate every single one of them. Be prepared!

17. March 10: Mario Day

Written in abbreviated form, this date reads Mar 10. Or, as it appeared to a Mr. Mario Fascitelli: MARIO. Fascitelli decided this quirk of the calendar was deserving of a holiday for people to celebrate the Marios in their lives.

18. March 12: National Alfred Hitchcock Day

Alfred Hitchcock
Peter Dunne, Express/Getty Images

Nobody’s particularly sure why March 12th is Alfred Hitchcock Day: it’s neither the Master of Suspense’s birthday (that’s August 13), nor does it commemorate the date of his death (that happened on April 29, 1980). Still, it’s as good a time as any to regale your movie-loving friends and family members with your encyclopedic knowledge of Hitchcock trivia.

19. March 13: National Open an Umbrella Indoors Day

This day is for facing down that age-old superstition: Open an umbrella indoors and shield yourself from the bad luck that may or may not follow. (We’re hoping it’s the latter.)

20. March 14: Pi Day

Professor writes out the full number Pi on a chalkboard
domin_domin/iStock via Getty Images

Don’t let the sound of the name fool you: 3/14 does not commemorate the sweet, baked circuitous treat (but feel free to grab a slice). It is the official day of the Greek letter symbolizing the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter, pi, also known as 3.14159265359 …

21. March 14: International Fanny Pack Day

Retro styled man putting a gigantic cell phone into his fanny pack
iStock.com/RyanJLane

From grandparents to Normcore hipsters, the fanny pack spans generations—and so does this holiday. And, for better or worse (but definitely worse), it doesn’t seem in danger of going anywhere.

22. March 15: True Confessions Day

According to the calendar, March 15 is the perfect day to confess all your deepest, darkest secrets. Good luck!

23. March 16: Lips Appreciation Day

Young woman wearing shiny lip gloss
yacobchuk/iStock via Getty Images

Pucker up and give your pout some well-deserved love and attention.

24. March 16: Everything You Do Is Right Day

Yes, that’s correct. We couldn’t agree more.

25. March 18: Forgive Mom and Dad Day

Vintage style photo of a mother trying to feed her fussy baby
George Marks/iStock via Getty Images

This is a lovely sentiment and one that works even if you don't explain to your randomly forgiven parent that your apology applies to all past ill-will, considering March 18 is also Awkward Moment Day.

26. March 18: Awkward Moment Day

You can start by wishing complete strangers a "happy awkward moment day." Or by telling your parents you forgive them (see above).

27. March 20: Won't You Be My Neighbor Day

Fred Rogers in a still from 'Won't You Be My Neighbor?' (2018)
Focus Features

Everyone's favorite neighbor, Fred Rogers, was born on March 20, 1928 and this holiday now serves as an occasion to remember the beloved TV star, and honor him by being kind, generous, and, well, downright neighborly.

28. March 20: Extraterrestrial Abductions Day

There’s no reason to believe that there will be an unusual proliferation of UFOs on this out-of-this-world holiday. At least that’s what Big Brother wants you to believe …

29. March 21: Play the Recorder Day

A student plays the recorder
Getty Images

Limber up those fingers and celebrate this ubiquitous childhood instrument with a rousing rendition of "Hot Cross Buns."

30. March 22: National Goof Off Day

Relax, take a break, play hooky—or just goof off in your own quiet way at your desk. (But if you tell your boss we’re the ones who suggested it, we’ll deny it.)

31. March 23: National Puppy Day

Golden retriever puppy playing with a toy
iStock.com/alexsokolov

Most of us don't really need an excuse to spend all day watching adorable young pups playing. But on March 23, it’s your nationally mandated duty. If merely observing puppies is not enough for you, consider donating to your local animal shelter—or just take the plunge and adopt one already (and send us pictures, please)!

32. March 25: Tolkien Reading Day

This annual holiday was started by The Tolkien Society back in 2003, and gives you a great excuse to re-read The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings sagas again, or for the very first time.

33. March 25: International Waffle Day

A waffle covered in butter and syrup
zkruger/iStock via Getty Images

A tradition that originated in Sweden, International Waffle Day basically encourages the consumption of all things bready and waffled. It’s hard to disagree with that.

34. March 30: Doctors' Day

Symbolized by a red carnation, this honoring of our nation's physicians has been held annually since 1933.

35. March 31: Eiffel Tower Day

The Eiffel Tower as seen as part of the Paris cityscape
narvikk/iStock via Getty Images

One of the world’s most famous “towers” was dedicated to the city of Paris on March 31, 1889. Named for its designer, Gustav Eiffel, the structure was intended to commemorate the French Revolution. This Parisian landmark isn’t the only famous structure with Eiffel’s paw prints all over it; he also helped design the framework of New York’s Statue of Liberty.

Learn Travel Blogging, Novel Writing, Editing, and More With This $30 Creative Writing Course Bundle

Centre of Excellence
Centre of Excellence

It seems like everyone is a writer lately, from personal blog posts to lengthy Instagram captions. How can your unique ideas stand out from the clutter? These highly reviewed courses in writing for travel blogs, novel writing, and even self-publishing are currently discounted and will teach you just that. The Ultimate Creative Writing Course Bundle is offering 10 courses for $29.99, which are broken down into 422 bite-sized lessons to make learning manageable and enjoyable.

Access your inner poet or fiction writer and learn to create compelling works of literature from home. Turn that passion into a business through courses that teach the basics of setting up, hosting, and building a blog. Then, the social media, design, and SEO lessons will help distinguish your blog.

Once you perfect your writing, the next challenge is getting that writing seen. While the bundle includes lessons in social media and SEO, it also includes a self-publishing course to take things into your own hands to see your work in bookshops. You’ll learn to keep creative control and royalties with lessons on the basics of production, printing, proofreading, distribution, and marketing efforts. The course bundle also includes lessons in freelance writing that teach how to make a career working from home.

If you’re more of an artistic writer, the calligraphy course will perfect your classical calligraphy scripts to confidently shape the thick and thin strokes of each letter. While it can definitely be a therapeutic hobby, it’s also a great side-hustle. Create your own designs and make some extra cash selling them as wedding placards or wall art.

Take your time perfecting your craft with lifetime access to the 10 courses included in The Ultimate Creative Writing Course Bundle. At the discounted price of $29.99, you’ll have spent more money on the coffee you’re sipping while you write your next novel than the courses themselves.

 

The Ultimate Creative Writing Course Bundle - $29.99

See Deal

At Mental Floss, we only write about the products we love and want to share with our readers, so all products are chosen independently by our editors. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a percentage of any sale made from the links on this page. Prices and availability are accurate as of the time of publication.

The Arlington National Cemetery Just Opened Its Time Capsule from 1915—See What’s Inside

That red ribbon is the literal "red tape" that we now use as an idiom to describe bureaucratic processes.
That red ribbon is the literal "red tape" that we now use as an idiom to describe bureaucratic processes.
Arlington National Cemetery, YouTube

In the decades following the Civil War, thousands of people assembled in Arlington National Cemetery’s James R. Tanner Amphitheater to honor the fallen soldiers each May on Decoration Day (which we now call Memorial Day). By the early 20th century, the event had grown so popular that Congress agreed to build a new, larger arena in its place: the Memorial Amphitheater.

When President Woodrow Wilson laid the cornerstone on October 13, 1915, it contained a copper box with documents and mementos that captured the spirit of the era. Though the contents weren’t kept a secret, you can now actually see them for yourself—on May 15, 2020, Arlington National Cemetery celebrated the centennial of the amphitheater’s dedication ceremony by opening the time capsule and displaying them in a virtual exhibit.

Inside the box was one of each coin used in 1915; uncirculated stamps bearing images of George Washington and Benjamin Franklin; an autographed photo of Wilson; a Bible signed by amphitheater architect Thomas Hastings; the dedication ceremony program; directories of both Congress and Washington D.C. residents; Civil War veterans’ pamphlets; four issues of local newspapers, including The Washington Post and The Washington Times; copies of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution; an American flag; and a map of Pierre Charles L’Enfant’s blueprints for building the city.

As Smithsonian.com reports, a few of those documents became outdated soon after being sealed in the box. The 1915 version of the Constitution had 17 amendments, but two new ones had been passed by the end of 1920: the 18th, prohibiting alcohol, and the 19th, giving women the right to vote. The American flag, on the other hand, was already inaccurate when it went into the time capsule. Though Arizona and New Mexico had both been annexed in 1912, bringing the state total to 48, the flag only included 46 stars.

Some of the items were wrapped in red tape, a seemingly insignificant detail that Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero found especially exciting.

“All of the records in the National Archives, when they were moved into that building, were carefully protected with wrappings that were held together with this red tape,” he said in a statement. “This is where the saying comes (from) about cutting through the red tape. It is actually—literally—the red tape.”

For the last few decades, the copper box shared its hollow cornerstone abode with another, less official time capsule: A Peter Pan-brand peanut butter jar, stuffed with business cards and other notes. The box had been relocated to the National Archives while the amphitheater underwent repairs in 1974, and the workers snuck the jar into the hollow when replacing it during the 1990s.

“It was sort of a rush job,” conservator Caitlin Smith told The Washington Post. “But you can understand the impulse to add your name to history.”

You can learn more about the history of the Memorial Amphitheater and discover more about the exhibit here.

[h/t Smithsonian.com]